DEAR SIR/MAAM,
THERE ARE ONLY 4 TYPES OF PRONOUNS ON MERITNATION - PERSONAL, POSSESIVE ,EMPHATIVE AND REFLEXIVE . BUT IN SCHOOL WE HAVE LEARNED 8 .

Indefinite Pronouns

An indefinite pronoun points to general persons, places or things.

Anyone can do that.

Did anybody see the actress?

One should look before leaping.

Someone has left the door open.

Somebody has stolen my jacket.

Some say that hay should be made while the sun shines.

 

Interrogative Pronouns

An interrogative pronoun is used for asking questions.

What is your name?

What is hidden under the picture?

(‘What’ is used for indicating the non-living.)

Which is Shyam’s house?

Which of these boys is the culprit?

(‘Which’ is used for indicating both the living and the non-living.)

Who are those people?

Who wants to go to the circus?

(‘Who’ is used for indicating humans.)

Whom are you talking to?

Whom do you wish to see?

(‘Whom’ is used for indicating humans.)

When ‘what’ and ‘which’ are used with some noun to ask a question, they are called interrogative adjectives.

What kind of organism is it?

Which shirt do you want to wear?

Remember: A noun does not immediately follow an interrogative pronoun, while an interrogative adjective always comes before a noun.

Relative Pronouns

A relative pronoun points to some noun going before it.

He is the man who came to my house yesterday.

(‘Who’ is used for indicating humans.)

She is the new president whom everyone loves to hate.

(‘Whom’ is used for indicating humans.)

She is the girl whose photo was in the paper.

(‘Whose’ is used for indicating ownership.)

This was the watch which I lost in the museum.

(‘Which’ is used for indicating the non-living and animals.)

He is boy that won the Math Olympiad.

(‘That’ is used for indicating both the living and the non-living.)

Demonstrative Pronouns

A demonstrative pronoun points to some noun going after it.

That is a banana.

(‘That’ points to the object ‘a banana’.)

These are good apples.

(‘These’ points to the object ‘apples’.)

When ‘this’, ‘that’, ‘these’ and ‘those’ are used with some noun, they are referred to as demonstrative adjectives.

That house is mine

(Ask the question ‘which house?’ and you get the answer ‘that’.)

Keerti gave me this pen.

(Ask the question ‘which pen?’ and you get the answer ‘this’.)

I can solve these puzzles.

(Ask the question ‘which puzzles?’ and you get the answer ‘these’.)

Those boys were playing in the park.

(Ask the question ‘which boys?’ and you get the answer ‘those’.)

Remember: A noun does not immediately follow a demonstrative pronoun, while a demonstrative adjective always comes before a noun.

Distributive Pronouns

A distributive pronoun points to persons, places or things one at a time.

Each of the students has done it.

Either of you has done it.

Neither of them has done it.

When ‘each’, ‘either’ and ‘neither’ are used along with some noun, they are called adjectives of number.

Each man has to speak for himself.

There is greenery on either side of the lake.

Neither problem has been solved.

Remember: A noun does not immediately follow a distributive pronoun.

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