Difference between cash crop and plantation crop.

Cash-crop farming is the practice of growing crops to be sold for a profit. Cash crops run the gamut from grains to fruits to vegetables, and they're grown for the purpose of making money. Cash crops can be consumed directly or processed into other products, such as sugar and biofuel. These crops can be sold domestically or exported to other countries.

In developed countries, almost all crops are grown for the purpose of generating revenue. In countries that aren't as developed, cash crops usually consist of those that draw demand in other, more developed countries and therefore have a degree of export value.

Prices for major cash crops are set in global commodities markets, with factors such as shipping costs and local supply and demand playing a major role. A country or region relying on a specific crop may suffer from lower pricing in the event that a similar crop elsewhere produces a remarkably large quantity, resulting in excess global supply. One such example is coffee, a cash crop that has been historically vulnerable to substantial commodity price fluctuations.
                    plantation(1) Single perennial crop is culti­vated systematically and scien­tifically on large estate resem­bling factory line production.

(ii) Carried on where there is abun­dant cheap labour.

(iii) It is cultivated for export and for the country s market.

(iv) Returns from the field are after 5 to 6 years but huge profits are obtained, e.g., Rubber, tea coffee, spices.

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cash crops
(i) Seasonal cash crops are culti­vated on large farms.

(ii) Carried on where labour is comparatively less.

(iii) Crop is cultivated mainly for the local market in the coun­try.

(iv) Returns from the field are quick but profits are compara­tively less. e.g., cotton, sugar cane. Jute, tobacco.

Plantation crops

(i) Single perennial crop is culti­vated systematically and scien­tifically on large estate resem­bling factory line production.

(ii) Carried on where there is abun­dant cheap labour.

(iii) It is cultivated for export and for the country s market.

(iv) Returns from the field are after 5 to 6 years but huge profits are obtained, e.g., Rubber, tea coffee, spices.
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