GIVE OTHER EXAMPLE  CORRELATIVE CONJUNCTION 

The   conjunctions,  which  are  used  in  pairs  to  correlate   phrases  or  clauses within a sentence, include either - orneither - nornot only - but also, and both - and. usually, a correlative conjunction does little to emphasize one phrase over another, as in the first two examples below. At most, the phrases may naturally contrast with each other, as in examples 3-6.

1.  The cat, purring contentedly, was neither thirsty nor hungry.

2.  Both the politicians who take the money and the donors who give it claim that there is no illegal or unethical influence in the practice.

3.  The doctor said that both green leafy vegetables and sweet desserts have a legitimate place in the average diet.

4.  According to the press, either the Chinese authorities or the members of the religious sect will have to back down.

5.  Not only the young girl but also the old man had a great time at the ice-skating competition.

6.  In the event of a catastrophic storm, neither the citizenry nor the government has the luxury of waiting for the other to help rebuild.

The writer, though, can create contrast with the addition of extra-contrastive markers, such as words of extra emphasis (too, even, else) and/or altered word order:

7.  Not only did the young girl have a great time at the ice-skating competition, but the old man did too.

8.  According to the press, either the Chinese authorities will have to back down, or else it will be the members of the religious sect who have to.

9.  The doctor said that both green leafy vegetables and less nutritious foods, even sweet desserts, have a legitimate place in the average diet.

 

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