What is the formula of past perfect tense,present perfect continuous tense and simple future tense?

Following are the formulas for the mentioned tenses:

Past Perfect:

Subject+ had+ III form of verb

For example: She had returned before I arrived.

Present Perfect:

Subject+ has/have+ III form of verb

For example: She has returned.

Simple Future:

Subject+ will/shall+ I form of verb

For example: She will return.

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SUb+had+third  form of the verb+object.

eg: He had done the home work long back.

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The past perfect tense is often used in English when we are relating two events which happened in the past. It helps to show which event happened first. This page will explain the rules for forming and using the tense.


Forming the past perfect tense

This tense is formed using two components: the verb HAVE (in the past tense), and the past participle form of a verb. With a regular verb the past participle ends with -ED (just like the simple past). Irregular verbs have a special past participle form that you have to learn. Here are the rules, using the regular verb "arrive" and the irregular verb "eat":

Subject
HAVE
Past Participle
Contraction
I
had
arrived.
eaten.
I'd arrived.
I'd eaten.
You
had
arrived.
eaten.
You'd arrived.
You'd eaten.
He
had
arrived.
eaten.
He'd arrived.
He'd eaten.
She
had
arrived.
eaten.
She'd arrived.
She'd eaten.
It
had
arrived.
eaten.
It'd arrived.
It'd eaten.
We
had
arrived.
eaten.
We'd arrived.
We'd eaten.
They
had
arrived.
eaten.
They'd arrived.
They'd eaten.
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Present Perfect Continuous Tense (Present Perfect Progressive Tense

The present perfect continuous is used with actions that began in the past and are still continuing. The formula for present perfect continuous is present tense of have + been + present participle (root + ‑ing). You’ll most often see this verb tense used with the wordsfor and since.

What have you been doing since I last saw you?

We’ve been moving house. There are still boxes to unpack.

They’ve been watching TV for three hours now.

The car has been sitting in the garage, unused, since last month.

Has Mary been going to all her classes?

Remember not to use the present perfect continuous tense with non-action verbs like be,seem, and know. These verbs should use the present perfect.

Mary has been seeming tired.

Mary has seemed tired.

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Simple Future Tense

The simple future is the tense we use when something will begin and end later. It’s created by putting will in front of the root word.

will learn a new language.

Annie will make a cake.

The cat will sleep all day.

Will you come to the beach with us?

Who will become the next president?

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will learn a new language.

Annie will make a cake.

The cat will sleep all day.

Will you come to the beach with us?

Who will become the next president?

 
 
 
 
 
 
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