Write an article on the topic ?India?s Challenges and Readiness in the Impending Third Wave
of Corona? in not more than 150 words.

Dear Student,

Such questions are made for enhancing the self creative skills and should be tried answering on your own. However, here are a few points that will help you in framing your answer:

Challenges
  • The large population size of our country means the absolute number of cases may be very high.
  • The health infrastructure of our nation is not satisfactory as successive governments have neglected the health sector.
  • The emergence of the delta variant.
Readiness 
  • India has ramped up its oxygen production levels.
  • The rate of vaccination has been increased since the outbreak of the second wave of the virus.
  • The testing capacity of India has been improved.
You may feel free to contact us if you face any issue or difficulty while composing your answer. You can also send us your answers here for feedback and required corrections, if any.

Regards

  • 1
Dear student,

Such questions are meant to test your writing skills and should be attempted on your own. However, these points might help you elaborate:
 
  • India faces multiple major challenges on the COVID-19 front. It is densely populated: 464 people/km2 compared with Italy’s 206, Spain’s 91, Iran’s 52 and the USA’s 36. 
  • India needs to move fast on infrastructure creation and vaccinations, given the small window of time it has
  • India is already bracing up to emerging variants. The delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 virus has raised concerns in Kerala, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Tamil Nadu
  • An important aspect of COVID-19 management is averting deaths. The current national guidelines do not prioritize high-risk individuals for early testing, and this is a missed opportunity for averting deaths in vulnerable populations of the elderly and those with comorbidities.
  • Reporting of deaths is incomplete, and because many individuals die without a COVID-19 test, the number of reported deaths is likely an underestimate of the true numbers. Identification of deaths offers an opportunity to learn about the disease and, thereby, prevent future cases and deaths. A formal system of mortality surveillance, specifically to measure the additional mortality attributable to COVID-19, needs to be put in place.19
  • The epidemic response should be data driven and locally owned. More granular data and greater openness to data sharing and coordination would enable surveillance data to be used for management decisions, including planning regarding personal protective equipment, medicines, supplies, and, most importantly, ICU capacity and healthcare personnel. This would provide a clear picture of the impact of COVID-19 to the public and could encourage greater compliance with personal protection and distancing.
  • Nongovernmental organizations and civil society have been largely missing from the response to the pandemic and should be involved in helping mitigate the continued effects of the lockdown and enabling access to health care.
  • Guidelines for clinical protocols for patient management should be updated rapidly, consistent with global research findings, and communicated clearly to clinicians. Despite national guidelines, there is confusion about how best to care for patients at home with asymptomatic infection, in hospital with mild-to-moderate disease, with serious disease requiring high flow oxygen, and with severe disease requiring mechanical ventilation.
  • India is now in a season during which other diseases including dengue, chikungunya, malaria, and seasonal influenza have symptoms that are similar to those of COVID-19. As these diseases are likely to have overlapping spread in the country, a clinical and testing strategy to enable distinction between the diseases is needed.

Regards.
 
  • 3
  • Nongovernmental organizations and civil society have been largely missing from the response to the pandemic and should be involved in helping mitigate the continued effects of the lockdown and enabling access to health care.
  • Guidelines for clinical protocols for patient management should be updated rapidly, consistent with global research findings, and communicated clearly to clinicians. Despite national guidelines, there is confusion about how best to care for patients at home with asymptomatic infection, in hospital with mild-to-moderate disease, with serious disease requiring high flow oxygen, and with severe disease requiring mechanical ventilation.
  •  
  • India is now in a season during which other diseases including dengue, chikungunya, malaria, and seasonal influenza have symptoms that are similar to those of COVID-19. As these diseases are likely to have overlapping spread in the country, a clinical and testing strategy to enable distinction between the diseases is needed.
  • 0
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