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Prepositions

Introduction to Prepositions


Prepositions are words that join a noun, a pronoun or a group of words acting as a noun with another part of a sentence. A preposition should always have at least one object (noun, pronoun or a group of words acting as a noun). This is the object that it joins with the rest of the sentence.

For example:

Reema’s house is located near the temple.

(Here, ‘near’ is a preposition that connects the noun ‘the temple’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘The temple’ is the object of the preposition, i.e., the prepositional object.)

[Remember: A preposition will always have an object.]


Prepositions are words that join a noun, a pronoun or a group of words acting as a noun with another part of a sentence. A preposition should always have at least one object (noun, pronoun or a group of words acting as a noun). This is the object that it joins with the rest of the sentence.

For example:

Reema’s house is located near the temple.

(Here, ‘near’ is a preposition that connects the noun ‘the temple’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘The temple’ is the object of the preposition, i.e., the prepositional object.)

[Remember: A preposition will always have an object.]

What does a preposition do?

A preposition shows the relation between its object and the part of a sentence with which it joins the object. Consider the following examples to understand the different relations shown by a preposition.

Nalini will return on Monday.

Here, ‘on’ is the preposition that connects ‘Monday’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘Monday’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

Nalini will return _______ Monday.

Very clearly, ‘Monday’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘Nalini will return’. When ‘on’ is added to the empty space, one gets to know WHEN Nalini will return. She will return ON Monday. Hence, in this sentence, the preposition indicates TIME.

Kapil is waiting in the park.

Here, ‘in’ is the preposition that connects ‘the park’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘The park’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

Kapil is waiting _______ the park.

Very clearly, ‘the park’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘Kapil is waiting’. When ‘in’ is added in the empty space, one gets to know WHERE Kapil is waiting. He is waiting IN the park. Hence, in this sentence, the preposition indicates PLACE.

Unni is going toward Raju’s house.

Here, ‘toward’ is the preposition that connects ‘Raju’s house’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘Raju’s house’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

Unni is going _______ Raju’s house.

Very clearly, ‘Raju’s house’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘Unni is going’. When ‘toward’ is added to the empty space, one gets to know WHERE Unni is going. He is going TOWARD Raju’s house. Hence, in this sentence, the preposition indicates MOVEMENT.

One should not learn things by rote.

Here, ‘by’ is the preposition that connects ‘rote’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘Rote’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

One should not learn things ______ rote.

Very clearly, ‘rote’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘one should not learn things’. When ‘by’ is added to the empty space, one gets to know HOW not to learn things. Things should not be learnt BY rote. Hence, in this sentence, the preposition indicates MANNER.

Yudhishtir went to Darjeeling for a vacation.

Here, ‘for’ is the preposition that connects ‘a vacation’ with the rest of the sentence. ‘A vacation’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

Yudhishtir went to Darjeeling _____ a vacation.

Very clearly, ‘a vacation’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘Yudhishtir went to Darjeeling’. When ‘for’ is added to the empty space, one gets to know WHY Yudhishtir went to Darjeeling. He went there FOR a vacation. Hence, in this sentence, the preposition indicates PURPOSE.

A leg of the round table is broken.

Here, ‘of’ is the preposition that connects ‘a leg’ with ‘the round table’. ‘The round table’ is the prepositional object.

Without the preposition, the sentence would look as follows:

A leg _____ the round table is broken.

Very clearly, ‘a leg’ has to be linked in some manner with ‘the round …

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