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NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Chapter 24 - Unit 6 Challenges To National Integration

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English Chapter 24 Unit 6 Challenges To National Integration are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Unit 6 Challenges To National Integration are extremely popular among class 10 students for English Unit 6 Challenges To National Integration Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the NCERT Book of class 10 English Chapter 24 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s NCERT Solutions. All NCERT Solutions for class 10 English are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 209:

Question B.1(1):

Why does the poet say, 'Where the mind is without fear'?

Answer:

The poet dreams of an egalitarian society. He dreams of a land where people have freedom to think. He contemplates for a world where the minds are free from any fear leading to a complete development of one’s individuality. Thus, the world becomes progressive and abounded with knowledge.

Page No 209:

Question B.1(2):

What are the narrow domestic walls being referred to?

Answer:

The “domestic walls” in the poem refer to the petty social divisions prevailing in the society such as caste, creed, religion region, etc.

Page No 209:

Question B.1(3):

Why are they 'narrow'?

Answer:

The poet calls the “domestic walls” narrow as they are making the society stagnant and incapable for progress and revolutionary idea are unable to proliferate through these walls. Thus, it is capturing the society in old and obsolete customs, stopping it from evolving.

Page No 209:

Question B.1(4):

How / when does the 'clear stream of reason' lose its way?

Answer:

The clear stream of reason loses its way when old customs and traditions shackle the society and people’s thoughts from reaching “the depth of truth”.

Page No 209:

Question B.1(5):

What is the poet's appeal?

Answer:

The poet appeals to God to bestow humans with reason and that all the boundaries constraining the progress of mankind to be dissolved. He wishes for an ideal society which would lead people’s minds into ever-widening thoughts and action. He prays to God to lead humans into a heaven where they may experience the purest form of freedom, unconstrained growth of this race and, just as said before, where people have freedom to think and their actions may be reasonable.



Page No 214:

Question B.4(1):

'Despite these disadvantages, he possessed great innate wisdom and a true generosity of spirit'. The expression 'these disadvantages' here refers to

(a) lack of formal education and riches

(b) middle class social status and a small town

(c) lack of comforts and luxuries

Answer:

(a) lack of formal education and riches

Page No 214:

Question B.4(2):

Kalam's childhood was

(a) secure

(b) insecure

(c) austere

Answer:

(a) secure

Page No 214:

Question B.4(3):

'That forced my cousin Samsuddin'… 'That' here refers to

(a) world War II

(b) increase in the demand of tamarind seeds

(c) withdrawal of train halt at Rameshwaram station

Answer:

(c) withdrawal of train halt at Rameshwaram station

Page No 214:

Question B.4(4):

Samsuddin was forced to seek a helping hand because

(a) the Second World War had begun

(b) the train now halted at Rameshwaram station

(c) newspapers thrown from the moving train had to be collected

Answer:

(c) newspapers thrown from the moving train had to be collected

Page No 214:

Question B.4(5):

Kalam continues to be proud of the money he had earned during the time of World

War-II because

(a) his cousin Samsuddin had helped him earn it

(b) it was the first wages he had earned

(c) he was able to supplement his father's income

Answer:

(b) it was the first wages he had earned

Page No 214:

Question B.4(6):

Kalam owes his honesty and self-discipline to his

(a) brothers

(b) father

(c) mother

Answer:

(b) father

Page No 214:

Question B.4(7):

As children Kalam and his friends did not have any

(a) religious differences

(b) right upbringing

(c) realization that they were different in any way

Answer:

(a) religious differences

Page No 214:

Question B.4(8):

Paragraph 5 shows that Kalam's mother and grandmother had

(a) great scholarship and wisdom

(b) excellent ability to tell stories of historic importance

(c) all embracing outlook on religion and communities

Answer:

(c) all embracing outlook on religion and communities

Page No 214:

Question B.4(9):

'As the new teacher saw it' (Paragraph 6). Which of the following best explains the meaning of this expression?

(a) as our new teacher understood it

(b) as our new teacher wanted it

(c) as our new teacher was asked to ensure

Answer:

(b) as our new teacher wanted it

Page No 214:

Question B.4(10):

Lakshmana Sastry made the newly appointed teacher realize that

(a) it was wrong on his part to discriminate on the basis of religion

(b) it was wrong to separate two great friends

(c) it was wrong to impose one's own ideas on others

Answer:

(a) it was wrong on his part to discriminate on the basis of religion

Page No 214:

Question B.4(11):

Kalam's science teacher Sivasubramania was something of a rebel in the sense that

(a) he used to spend hours with his students

(b) he used to defy his wife

(c) he encouraged people of different communities and castes to mix up freely

Answer:

(c) he encouraged people of different communities and castes to mix up freely

Page No 214:

Question B.4(12):

The science teacher's wife's behaviour during Kalam's second visit to their home showed that

(a) she had understood and adopted her husband's outlook on the oneness of mankind

(b) she wanted to repent for her earlier mistake

(c) she had purified her kitchen ritually

Answer:

(a) she had understood and adopted her husband's outlook on the oneness of mankind

Page No 214:

Question B.4(13):

Father gave Kalam the example of the seagull to

(a) encourage him to be adventurous and fearless

(b) encourage him to study the science of flying

(c) encourage him to be creative and imaginative

Answer:

(a) encourage him to be adventurous and fearless

Page No 214:

Question B.4(14):

"Once you decide to change the system, such problems have to be confronted."

Which problems are referred to here?

(a) keeping kitchens ritually pure

(b) discrimination and boycott on the basis of one's faith

(c) differences in the way people of different communities live

Answer:

(b) discrimination and boycott on the basis of one's faith



Page No 217:

Question B.5:

Complete the following sentences.

a. An example of the generosity and kindness of Kalam's parents is

____________________________________________________

b. Kalam feels he had a very secure childhood because____________________

c. The suspension of train halt at Rameshwaram station proved to be a blessing in disguise for Kalam because_______________________________

d. Kalam continues to feel proud about the money he had earned in childhood by picking up bundles of newspaper because______________________________

e. Some traits and values Kalam and his siblings inherited from their parents were_____________________________

f. The salient feature of Kalam's relationship with his three childhood friends was that_____________________________

g. Two unique examples of communal harmony and brotherhood of mankind are________________________________

h. The nation should be wary of people like the grade V teacher of the narrator because___________________________

i. However, the country needs more and more people like Kalam's Science teacher Sivasubramania and Kalam's mother and grandmother because__________________

j. Kalam's second visit to his science teacher's house surprised him because ___________________________________________________________

Answer:

a. That despite their not too good financial conditions they used to feed far more outsiders with them than all the members of their own family put together.

b. His father used to cater to all the necessities in terms of food, medicine and clothes.

c. Samsuddin, Kalam’s cousin who distributed the newspapers needed a helping hand to collect the bundles, as now, due to the halt, the newspapers were bundled and thrown out from the moving train on the Rameswaram Road between Rameswaram and Dhanuskodi. So, Kalam got a chance to help his cousin and earn his first wages for the first time.

d. It was the first time ever in his life that he had earned wages on his own.

e. Kalam and his siblings inherited honesty and self-discipline from their father; from their mother, they inherited faith in goodness and deep kindness.

f. Though his friends were from orthodox Hindu Brahmin families, as children, none of them ever felt any difference amongst themselves because of their religious differences and upbringing.

g. (i) During the annual Shri Sita Rama Kalyanam ceremony, Kalam’s family, despite being followers of Islam, used to arrange boats with a special platform for carrying idols of the Lord from the temple to the marriage site. Not just this, his mother and grandmother used to tell stories from events from not just life of Prophet but also from the Ramayana (epic of Hindus).

(ii) In fifth grade Kalam and his dear friend Ramanadha Sastry were separated by a new teacher, on the basis of religious differences; both Kalam and his Sastry told their respective parents about the incident. Lakshmana Sastry, who was the highest priest in Rameswaram temple, summoned the teacher and told the teacher not to fill nubile minds of children with the dirt of communalism and made him apologise for his act.

h. Such people who spread the dirt of communalism in the society. And in this case when the person in question is an educator he should be severely punished so that he doesn’t pollute young minds with such petty issues and shackle their intellectual growth and jeopardise their progress.

i. They are faithful to mankind and propound secularity. They are truly religious as they teach children to be honest and self-disciplined and to have faith in goodness and deep kindness. They fight the bad elements of the society who are hindrance in co-existence.

j. This time the wife of his teacher herself served food to Kalam in the kitchen.



Page No 218:

Question B.8(1):

For reasons I have never been able to understand, a sudden demand for tamarind seeds erupted in the market.

(a) came up

(b) blew up

(c) ended

Answer:

(b) came up

Page No 218:

Question B.8(2):

My brother-in-law Jallaluddin would tell me stories about the War which I would later attempt to trace in the headlines in Dinamani.

(a) draw

(b) locate

(c) copy

Answer:

(b) locate

Page No 218:

Question B.8(3):

The first casualty came in the form of the suspension of the train halt at Rameswaram station.

(a) target

(b) something destroyed as an indirect result of a particular event or circumstances

(c) victim

Answer:

(c) victim

Page No 218:

Question B.8(4):

My cousin Samsuddin, was looking for a helping hand to catch the bundles and, as if naturally, I filled the slot.

(a) was found suitable for the purpose

(b) applied for the job

(c) was rejected

Answer:

(a) was found suitable for the purpose

Page No 218:

Question B.8(5):

The new teacher could not stomach a Hindu priest's son sitting with a Muslim boy.

(a) tolerate

(b) dislike

(c) face

Answer:

(a) tolerate

Page No 218:

Question B.8(6):

He looked utterly downcast as I shifted to my seat in the last row.

(a) happy

(b) angry

(c) dejected

Answer:

(c) dejected

Page No 218:

Question B.8(7):

Sivasubramania Iyer was not perturbed, nor did he get angry with his wife

(a) relaxed

(b) agitated

(c) panicky

Answer:

(b) agitated

Page No 218:

Question B.8(8):

Then the Second World War was over and India's freedom was imminent.

(a) at hand

(b) well-known

(c) distant

Answer:

(a) at hand



Page No 220:

Question B.9:

Phrases

Match the phrases in Column A with their meanings in Column B

Column A

Column B

Break out

to try to find somebody or something

To look for

as a rule or in general taking all relevant factors into account

To take over

start suddenly and strongly

To go into

to obtain or assume control of something, or gain control of something from somebody else

On the whole

to begin a job or career in a particular area of activity

Answer:

Column A

Column B

Break out

start suddenly and strongly

To look for

to try to find somebody or something

To take over

to obtain or assume control of something, or gain control of something from somebody else

To go into

to begin a job or career in a particular area of activity

On the whole

as a rule or in general taking all relevant factors into account



Page No 223:

Question B.13(a):

Why is national integration important for a country like India?

Answer:

Indian population comprises various races, religions, cultures and language groups. Thus, due to this cultural diversity, national integration becomes the prime objective. In order to establish peace and stability and ensure progress, people from different societies must be brought together into one single nation with a national consciousness.

Page No 223:

Question B.13(b):

What are the aims of national integration?

Answer:

National integration aims at improving socio-cultural relations, reducing economic inequalities and strengthening unity and solidarity.

Page No 223:

Question B.13(c):

What are the forces that challenge national integration?

Answer:

Regionalism, communalism, religious fanaticism, linguistic difference and now terrorism are the main forces that are a threat to national integration. For a citizen, country always comes first.

Page No 223:

Question B.13(d):

What are the steps that we should take to strengthen the nation and its unity?

Answer:

Various detrimental elements are present in our society jeopardising national integration. These must be curbed for co-existence. High regional aspirations that may break the country into multiple small states should be controlled. Communalism shall be dealt with, in order to avoid clashes between various communities. No community should be placed above the nation. Lingual preferences should be peacefully dealt with so that no excessive bias or favour for any one language brings about agitation in the country. Religious fanaticism is another dangerous force that often leads to violence, not only in India, but all over the world. India is a secular country, but that hasn’t solved all problems and it is time to do so now.

Page No 223:

Question B.13(e):

How can we bind the people of the country and create an emotional bond?

Answer:

A common driving force must be identified to create an emotional bond between the people of the country. Common ideas and values must be shared. Constitution, territorial continuity, art, literature, music, national festivals, national flag, national anthem, sports and, let us not forget, Bollywood−these are the vital aspects that may be exploited to promote national integration. Educational and economic grass root development may foster national integration. Education is a good medium to inculcate national integration since childhood.

Page No 223:

Question B.13(f):

How can we attain internal freedom for the people of the country?

Answer:

Internal freedom means a mind free of selfish ego and aware of basic values and humanity in general; a conscience always awakened and strong, and love and true spirit in the core of heart. Such a free mind remains open to other cultures, religions and languages and will easily accept different people of the country. Exercise of power and authority may be successful temporarily, but fails in the long run. A free mind remains open to other cultures, religions and languages and will easily accept different people of the country.

Page No 223:

Question B.14:

Read the passage carefully and familiarize yourself with the new words used in the passage by working out their meanings. Match the words in column A with their meanings in column B.

Column A

Column B

Foster

The act of accepting someone as a part of a group

Pernicious

Excessive enthusiasm for an extreme political or religious cause

Integration

Encourage the development of

Fanaticism

Agreement and support resulting from shared interests, feelings or opinions

Solidarity

Having a harmful effect

Answer:

Column A

Column B

Foster

Encourage the development of

Pernicious

Having a harmful effect

Integration

The act of accepting someone as a part of a group

Fanaticism

Excessive enthusiasm for an extreme political or religious cause

Solidarity

Agreement and support resulting from shared interests, feelings or opinions



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