Active Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 4 Fibres, Fabric And Clothing are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Fibres, Fabric And Clothing are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Fibres, Fabric And Clothing Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Active Science Book of class 6 Science Chapter 4 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Active Science Solutions. All Active Science Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 36:

Question 1:

State whether the sentences are true or false. Correct and rewrite the wrong sentences.
(a) Fibres are made from yarns.
(b) All fibres are made of cotton wool.
(c) Cotton is obtained from the stem of the cotton plant.
(d) Spinning is a process of making yarn from fibres.
(e) The separation of cotton fibres from the seeds is known as carding.
(f) Weaving and knitting are two ways of changing yarn to fabric.
(g) A takli is used to weave fabric.
(h) Jute grows well in a hot, damp climate.
(i) Silk is obtained from an insect.
(j) Nylon is a natural fibre.

Answer:

(a) False. Yarn is made by twisting fibres together.

(b) False. Fibres are made of cotton, jute, coconut, etc.

(c) False. Cotton is obtained from the cotton balls of the cotton plant. Cotton seeds inside the cotton balls are surrounded by cotton fibre.

(d) True

(e) False. The separation of cotton fibres from the seeds is known as ginning.

(f) True

(g) False. A takli is used for spinning.

(h) True

(i) True

(j) False.  Nylon is a synthetic fibre.

Page No 36:

Question 2:

Which of the following is the correct sequence in processing cotton?
(a) ginning, carding, combing, spinning, weaving
(b) spinning, weaving, ginning, carding, combing
(c) ginning, combing, carding, spinning, weaving
(d) ginning, carding, combing, weaving, spinning

Answer:

(a) Ginning, carding, combing, spinning, weaving

In processing cotton, the first process is of ginning, in which all the cotton fibres are separated from the seeds. The next process is carding, in which the raw cotton fibres are pulled apart and cleaned to remove all dust and impurities. The third process is called combing, in which the fibre is cleaned, straightened and made into soft, untwisted strands. Then follows the process of transforming fibre into yarn, known as spinning. Finally, the yarn is converted into cloth by the process of weaving.

Page No 36:

Question 3:

Which of these fibres is obtained from plants: cotton, jute, silk, nylon?
(a) only silk
(b) both cotton and jute
(c) cotton, jute and nylon
(d) only jute

Answer:

(b) Both cotton and jute
Only cotton and jute are obtained from plants. While silk is obtained from silkworms, nylon is a synthetic fibre.

Page No 36:

Question 4:

Which of these animals does not provide wool?
(a) sheep
(b) cow
(c) goat
(d) rabbit

Answer:

(b) Cow
Wool is obtained by extracting the protective covering or fleece of sheep and other such hairy animals like goats and rabbits. Wool is not obtained from cows.

Page No 36:

Question 5:

In which one of these states does the jute plant grow?
(a) Punjab
(b) Tamil Nadu
(c) West Bengal
(d) Kerala

Answer:

(c) West Bengal
Jute plant grows in West Bengal.

Page No 36:

Question 6:

What is common to the two objects shown in the pictures below?
(a) Both are used to make yarn from fibre.
(b) Both are used to make yarn into cloth.
(c) Both are used in the process of ginning.
(d) There is nothing common as one runs on electricity and the other is used by hand.
Figure

Answer:

(a) Both are used to make yarn from fibre.
Spinning is the process of transforming fibre into yarn. Spinning is done with the help of charkha or takli.

Page No 36:

Question 7:

On burning her cotton handkerchief and a paper from her old notebook, naughty Sanjana found that both burned with the same odour and changed into grey ash. What can you conclude from this?
(a) Both cotton and paper are white in colour.
(b) Both are obtained from plants.
(c) Both are obtained from animals.
(d) It is just a coincidence.

Answer:

(b) Both are obtained from plants.
It means that both cotton and paper are plant products.



Page No 37:

Question 8:

What should come in the blank next to 4 in the figure below?
Figure
(a) fibre
(b) medicine
(c) nylon
(d) jute

Answer:

(d) Jute
The first circle represents natural fibre. The second circle represents material made from plants. Cotton is a natural fibre and is obtained from plants. Jute has the same characteristics according to the information in the question. Therefore option 'd' should be filled in the blank.

Page No 37:

Question 9:

The process in which a single yarn is converted into a fabric is known as
(a) weaving.
(b) knitting.
(c) spinning.
(d) handloom.

Answer:

(b) knitting
Knitting is the process by which a single yarn is converted into a fabric.

Page No 37:

Question 10:

Name two items each made from each of these fibres.
(a) cotton
(b) jute

Answer:

(a) Cotton: Garments, pillows

(b) Jute: Gunny bags, jute jewellery

Page No 37:

Question 11:

Write short notes.
(a) ginning
(b) knitting
(c) fibres obtained from animals

Answer:

(a) Ginning:

In the processing of cotton, the first step is ginning, in which all the cotton fibres are separated from the seeds. It is done by a machine called gin or by combing.

(b) Knitting:

The process by which a single yarn is converted into a fabric is called knitting. Knitting is done by both methods, i.e., by hand and by machines.

(c) Fibres obtained from animals:
    Wool and silk are the two fibres obtained from animals. Wool is obtained from the fleece of sheep and other such hairy animals. Silk is obtained from silkworms.

Page No 37:

Question 12:

Name the part of the plant from where the following are obtained.
(a) cotton
(b) jute

Answer:

(a) Cotton: It is obtained from the seed pod of the cotton plant.

(b) Jute: It is obtained from the stem of the jute plant.

Page No 37:

Question 13:

Explain the differences between:
(a) carding and combing
(b) natural and synthetic fibres
(c) angora wool and cashmere

Answer:

 (a)

Carding Combing
Carding is the process by which raw cotton fibres are pulled apart and cleaned to remove all dust and impurities Combing is the process by which the cotton fibre is cleaned and straightened into soft, untwisted strands

(b)
Natural Fibres Synthetic Fibres
Obtained from plants and animals. These are man-made
Examples are: cotton, jute, silk, wool Examples are: nylon, polyester

(c)
Angora wool Cashmere
Angora wool is obtained from the Angora rabbit. Cashmere is a type of wool obtained from the Kashmir goat.

Page No 37:

Question 14:

The pictures here show you the journey of cotton wool from its plant to a fabric. Describe each picture in your notebook to show the correct sequence of the complete process.
Figure

Answer:

(a) The first picture is showing cotton balls.

(b) The second picture is showing a cotton field.

(c) The third picture is showing the process of ginning, in which the cotton fibres are separated from the seeds.

(d) The fourth picture is showing the process of carding, in which the raw cotton fibres are pulled apart and cleaned to
remove all the dust and impurities.

(e) The fifth picture is showing a charkha, which is used for spinning.

(f) The final picture is showing a handloom, which is used to convert yarn into cloth.

Page No 37:

Question 15:

Describe the process by which jute fibres are extracted from the plant.

Answer:

Jute fibres are extracted from the jute plant by keeping the stem of the plant soaked in water for a few days. This loosens the fibre from the stem. The stem softens, allowing jute fibre to be separated by hand.

Page No 37:

Question 16:

Is it a good idea for a farmer to grow cotton plants in Kerala where there is rich laterite soil and it rains for most parts of the year? Why or why not?

Answer:

Laterite soil is not suitable for growing cotton because cotton requires deep, fertile soil with adequate humus and high water-holding capacity. Laterite soil is poor in fertility; it cannot hold water for a long time. Also, cotton is sensitive to excessive moisture; that is why a rainy climate is not suitable for growing cotton.

Page No 37:

Question 17:

(a) List four fibres. Give their sources and use in your daily life.
(b) How does a farmer know that cotton fibre on the plant is mature and ready to be plucked?

Answer:

(a) The four fibres are as follows:

  • Cotton: It is obtained from cotton plants. Cotton is a part of our daily lives. Apart from making many kinds of fabric, it is used for filling mattresses, quilts, pillows and for making threads.
  • Jute: It is obtained from the stem of the jute plant. Jute yarn is used to make the gunny sacks in which rice is stored and sold. Fashionable shopping bags and table mats and even beads and jewellery made from jute are sold in the market.
  • Wool: It is extracted from furry animals like sheep and rabbits. It is used to make sweaters which protect us from cold weather.
  • Silk: It is obtained from silk worms. Silk is used to make fabric.
(b) When the seed pods of a cotton plant ripen, they open up. When this happens, a farmer knows that cotton fibre on the plants is ready to be plucked.



Page No 38:

Question 18:

Use the clues given to complete this crossword.
CLUES
Across

1. cotton fibre without the seed
4. using needles to make fabric from wool
5. In summer, we like to wear only clothes made from this material.
7. long, shiny plant fibre, made into ropes and gunny bags
8. man made material
9. fine thread made from fibre
11. type of soil on which cotton grows well
14. Indian spinning wheel
15. another name for hairy covering of animals
18. process of changing fibre into yarn
20. process of separating cotton fibre from seed
23. long piece of cloth wound around the head by Indian men
24. cleaning, straightening and untwisting cotton fibres
26. soft, expensive, natural fabric
Down
1. cloth is woven on these
2. a common synthetic material
3. another word for fine threads
4. special name given to handspun, handwoven cotton cloth in India
5. fibre obtained from Kashmir goat
6. fibres from plants and animals
10. process of pulling apart raw cotton fibres and cleaning them
11. seed pods of cotton plant
12. animal source of angora wool
13. process of changing yarn to fabric
16. animal home made of fine silk threads
17. name for handmade cloth
19. unstitched cloth worn by Indian women
20. animal whose hairy coat gives us a very soft wool
21. parts of jute plants used to get fibres
22. fibre from husk of the coconut
25. machine used to separate cotton fibres from seeds
Figure

Answer:



Word for 17 down does not exist, hence, answer has not been given.



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