Basic Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 17 Air The Breath Of Life are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Air The Breath Of Life are extremely popular among Class 6 students for Science Air The Breath Of Life Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Basic Science Book of Class 6 Science Chapter 17 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Basic Science Solutions. All Basic Science Solutions for class Class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 173:

Question A.1:

Answer:

Air bubbles come out when soil is added to water because soil contains small pores that contain air. When water enters these pores, it displaces air.

Page No 173:

Question A.2:

Air bubbles come out when soil is added to water because soil contains small pores that contain air. When water enters these pores, it displaces air.

Answer:

Presence of air in soil is essential for plants because roots of plants absorb oxygen from soil for the growth of the plants. If soil lacks air, plants growing in it will die.

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Question A.3:

Presence of air in soil is essential for plants because roots of plants absorb oxygen from soil for the growth of the plants. If soil lacks air, plants growing in it will die.

Answer:

Two elements present in air are oxygen and nitrogen.
Two compounds present in air are carbon dioxide and water vapour.

Page No 173:

Question A.4:

Two elements present in air are oxygen and nitrogen.
Two compounds present in air are carbon dioxide and water vapour.

Answer:

Two major components of air are nitrogen, which is about 78.1 percent of air by volume, and oxygen, which is about 21 percent of air by volume.

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Question A.5:

Two major components of air are nitrogen, which is about 78.1 percent of air by volume, and oxygen, which is about 21 percent of air by volume.

Answer:

No, the composition of air is not strictly fixed. It changes with altitude. At higher altitudes, the percentage of heavier components decreases.

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Question A.6:

No, the composition of air is not strictly fixed. It changes with altitude. At higher altitudes, the percentage of heavier components decreases.

Answer:

The amount of carbon dioxide would be higher in air at places situated at low altitudes.

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Question A.7:

The amount of carbon dioxide would be higher in air at places situated at low altitudes.

Answer:

In rainy season, a higher proportion of water vapour is expected in air.

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Question A.8:

In rainy season, a higher proportion of water vapour is expected in air.

Answer:

When carbon is burnt in air, it forms carbon dioxide.

Page No 173:

Question B.1:

When carbon is burnt in air, it forms carbon dioxide.

Answer:

Activity to show that water contains air:

Take some cold water in a glass and keep it outside for a few hours on a warm day. Small air bubbles will be observed on the walls of the glass. This occurs due to the presence of air that is dissolved in water.

Page No 173:

Question B.2:

Activity to show that water contains air:

Take some cold water in a glass and keep it outside for a few hours on a warm day. Small air bubbles will be observed on the walls of the glass. This occurs due to the presence of air that is dissolved in water.

Answer:

To show that a candle needs air to burn:

Burn a candle and cover it with a glass. After a few minutes, the candle will stop burning. This occurs because the amount of air (oxygen) is limited in the glass. As soon as the oxygen is consumed by the burning candle, it stops burning. This shows that air is needed for burning a candle.

Page No 173:

Question B.3:

To show that a candle needs air to burn:

Burn a candle and cover it with a glass. After a few minutes, the candle will stop burning. This occurs because the amount of air (oxygen) is limited in the glass. As soon as the oxygen is consumed by the burning candle, it stops burning. This shows that air is needed for burning a candle.

Answer:

Hair, present in the nostrils, trap the soot and dust particles that enter the nose with air when we inhale.

Page No 173:

Question B.4:

Hair, present in the nostrils, trap the soot and dust particles that enter the nose with air when we inhale.

Answer:

Uses of air:

(a) It is required by plants for photosynthesis.
(b) It is required by plants and animals for respiration.
(c) It regulates the temperature of the earth.
(d) It acts as a medium for sound to travel and helps us to hear a sound.
(e) It is compressed to be used in inflating tyres.

Page No 173:

Question C.1:

Uses of air:

(a) It is required by plants for photosynthesis.
(b) It is required by plants and animals for respiration.
(c) It regulates the temperature of the earth.
(d) It acts as a medium for sound to travel and helps us to hear a sound.
(e) It is compressed to be used in inflating tyres.

Answer:

A so-called empty glass is not empty; it always contains air. This can be proved by the following activity:

Invert an empty glass and push it into a bucket filled with water. Water will not be able to enter the glass. Now, tilt the glass. Water will enter the glass and bubbles will come out of it. This happens because the air present in the glass gets displaced by water when we tilt the glass.
Water was not able to enter the glass when we kept it inverted because air is lighter than water and it remained at the top.

Page No 173:

Question C.2:

A so-called empty glass is not empty; it always contains air. This can be proved by the following activity:

Invert an empty glass and push it into a bucket filled with water. Water will not be able to enter the glass. Now, tilt the glass. Water will enter the glass and bubbles will come out of it. This happens because the air present in the glass gets displaced by water when we tilt the glass.
Water was not able to enter the glass when we kept it inverted because air is lighter than water and it remained at the top.

Answer:

Air causes downward displacement of water. This can be depicted by the following activity:

Take a bottle and fill it with water. Close its mouth with thumb and invert it into a bucket filled with water. Put one end of a bent drinking straw in the bottle and blow air from the other end. It is observed that bubbles rise up the liquid in the bottle. The level of water in the bottle will decrease after air gets collected in the bottle. Slowly, the water level in the bottle will become the same as that of the bucket and it will be full of air.
This shows that water gets displaced in downward direction due to air.

Page No 173:

Question C.3:

Air causes downward displacement of water. This can be depicted by the following activity:

Take a bottle and fill it with water. Close its mouth with thumb and invert it into a bucket filled with water. Put one end of a bent drinking straw in the bottle and blow air from the other end. It is observed that bubbles rise up the liquid in the bottle. The level of water in the bottle will decrease after air gets collected in the bottle. Slowly, the water level in the bottle will become the same as that of the bucket and it will be full of air.
This shows that water gets displaced in downward direction due to air.

Answer:

Plants and animals depend on one another for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The amount of oxygen released by plants during photosynthesis is consumed by animals. On the other hand, animals and plants release carbon dioxide during respiration and it is used up by plants during photosynthesis. This is an example of interdependence of plants and animals.

Page No 173:

Question D.1:

Plants and animals depend on one another for oxygen and carbon dioxide. The amount of oxygen released by plants during photosynthesis is consumed by animals. On the other hand, animals and plants release carbon dioxide during respiration and it is used up by plants during photosynthesis. This is an example of interdependence of plants and animals.

Answer:

(c) the dissolved air

Fish and other aquatic animals derive oxygen from the air dissolved in water.

Page No 173:

Question D.2:

(c) the dissolved air

Fish and other aquatic animals derive oxygen from the air dissolved in water.

Answer:

(c) mass

Air occupies space and has mass.

Page No 173:

Question D.3:

(c) mass

Air occupies space and has mass.

Answer:

(c) Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is the constituent of air that is used in photosynthesis.



Page No 174:

Question D.4:

(c) Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is the constituent of air that is used in photosynthesis.

Answer:

(b) Oxygen

Oxygen is released in photosynthesis.

Page No 174:

Question D.5:

(b) Oxygen

Oxygen is released in photosynthesis.

Answer:

(b) Oxygen

Oxygen from the air is used in respiration.

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Question D.6:

(b) Oxygen

Oxygen from the air is used in respiration.

Answer:

(c) Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is released in respiration.

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Question E:

(c) Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is released in respiration.

Answer:

1. The earth is surrounded by a thick blanket of air.
2. Water, when poured into a glass, displaces air from the latter.
3. Air is a gaseous mixture.
4. A diver carries oxygen for respiration.
5. Nitrogen is neither combustible nor a supporter of combustion.
6. The dust present in air helps in the formation of clouds.



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