Basic Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 4 Clothes And Fibres are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Clothes And Fibres are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Clothes And Fibres Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Basic Science Book of class 6 Science Chapter 4 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Basic Science Solutions. All Basic Science Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

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Primitive people used leaves, barks or animal skins to cover themselves.

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There are two different kinds of looms:

(a) Hand loom: It is operated manually.
(b) Power loom: It is operated by electric power.

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Following are the uses of cotton:

  1. It is used for manufacturing cloth materials.
  2. It is used to make certain artificial fibres.
  3. It is used to make different kinds of paper and cellophane.
  4. It is used to make an explosive called guncotton.
  5. Its seed is used to make cottonseed oil.

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Following are the uses of flax:

  1. It is used to make linen and laces.
  2. It is used to make fine paper (cigarette paper).
  3. It is used to make fishing linen and nets.

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A cloth which is a good absorber of water, is a bad conductor of heat. If a cloth absorbs water efficiently, it means that it contains large air spaces between its fibres and air is a bad conductor of heat.

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When cloth was not known, people used to cover themselves with leaves and barks of trees or with animal skin. They used to pierce holes in animal skin to draw thin strips of leather. These small pieces were then joined to make bigger pieces that would fit them.

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Fibres are classified on the basis of how they are obtained. Fibres of two types:

(i) Natural fibres: They are derived from plants and animals. Examples: cotton and jute.
(ii) Synthetic fibres: They are manufactured artificially. Examples: nylon and rayon.

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Spinning is the process of twisting the fibres together to form long threads called yarns. Spinning increases the strength of the fibre. It is done by a spinning machine on a large scale. On a small scale, spinning is done by a tool called charkha.
Weaving is the process of winding the yarn on reels (bobbins) and converting it into cloth. It is done either on a hand-loom or a power-loom.

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We can do the following activity to demonstrate the abilities of different fabrics to absorb water:

Collect different types of fabrics. Take a metal ring and wrap it tightly with a piece of cloth. Drop some water in the centre of the cloth using a dropper. Start a stop watch simultaneously. As the cloth soaks the first drop, add the second drop and continue like this. Stop the watch when the soaked water touches the metal ring. Note down the time.
Repeat this activity with the other samples of fabrics and record your observations.

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(d) Cotton
Cotton is obtained from the bolls of the cotton flower.

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(a) Cotton
Cotton plants grow best in black soil and in a warm climate.

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(b) Flax
Flax is obtained from the stem of the flax plant.

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(d) All of these
All of the given options, i.e. nylon, polyester and terylene are synthetic fibres.

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(d) Polyester
Polyester is a synthetic fibre and burns much faster than natural fibres.

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1. Jute is used for making gunny bags.
2. Gin was invented in India.
3. After the invention of the needle, clothes that suited one's body could be made.
4. Cotton is a better absorbent of water than nylon.
5. Clothes made of synthetic fibres burn faster.

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A B
(a) Warp (ii) The lengthwise yarn in the loom.
(b) Retting (i) Removal of gummy matter from the stem of a flax or jute plant by bacterial action in stagnant water.
(c) Ginning (iv) Removal of seeds from cotton.
(d) Weft (iii) The crosswise yarn in the loom.



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