Living Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 14 Fun With Magnets are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Fun With Magnets are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Fun With Magnets Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Living Science Book of class 6 Science Chapter 14 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Living Science Solutions. All Living Science Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 160:

Question 1:

Which of the following is not a magnetic material?
(a) gold
(b) nickel
(c) iron
(d) cobalt

Answer:

(a) Gold
Gold is not a magnetic material.

Page No 160:

Question 2:

The magnetic strength of a magnet
(a) is uniform throughout the body of the magnet.
(b) is concentrated at one point called the pole of the magnet.
(c) is concentrated in two regions called the poles of the magnet.
(d) is concentrated in the centre of the magnet.

Answer:

(c) is concentrated in two regions called the poles of the magnet
The magnetic strength of a magnet is concentrated in two regions called the poles of the magnet.

Page No 160:

Question 3:

If a magnet is rolled in a packet of steel pins, the pins will get most attracted to
(a) the north pole.
(b) the south pole.
(c) the centre of the magnet.
(d) equally to both poles.

Answer:

(d) equally to both poles.
If a magnet is rolled in a packet of steel pins, the pins will get attracted equally to both poles.

Page No 160:

Question 4:

Which of these does not use a magnet?
(a) LCD TV
(b) electric fan
(c) computer hard disk
(d) DVD

Answer:

 (a)LCD TV

An LCD TV does not use a magnet whereas electric fan, computer hard disk and DVD make use of magnets.

Page No 160:

Question 5:

A freely suspended magnet comes to rest in the
(a) north-south direction.
(b) north-east direction.
(c) north-west direction.
(d) east-west direction.

Answer:

(a) north-south direction.
A freely suspended magnet comes to rest in the north-south direction.

Page No 160:

Question 6:

Which of the following cannot happen, irrespective of whether the given iron bar B is a bar magnet or not?
(a) Both ends of B are attracted to the north pole of a magnet.
(b) Both ends of B are attracted to the south pole of a magnet.
(c) One end of B is attracted and the other end is repelled by the north pole of a magnet.
(d) Both ends of B are repelled by the south pole of a magnet.

Answer:

(d) Both ends of B are repelled by the south pole of the magnet.

If the bar B is not a magnet, then both ends of B can be attracted to the south pole and repulsion cannot take place. If B is a bar magnet, then one end of B will be repelled by the south pole, namely B's south pole. However, B's north pole will be attracted towards the south pole of the bar magnet. Again, both ends being repelled cannot happen.



Page No 161:

Question 1:

Why does a freely suspended magnet point in the north−south direction?

Answer:

A freely suspended magnet always points in the north–south direction because earth behaves like a huge bar magnet. The geographic north pole of the earth is the magnetic south pole and the geographic south pole is the magnetic north pole.

Page No 161:

Question 2:

What will happen to the poles of a magnet if it is broken into two?

Answer:

When a magnet is broken into two, the resultant is two separate magnets. Each resultant magnet will end up with its own north and south pole. This shows that poles exist in pairs and there can never be an isolated north or an isolated south pole.

Page No 161:

Question 3:

Will a strong magnet attract a piece of copper? Why?

Answer:

No, a strong magnet will not attract a piece of copper because copper is not a magnetic metal.

Page No 161:

Question 4:

State the rule for attraction and repulsion between two magnets.

Answer:

Rule of attraction of magnets states that "when a south pole of a magnet is brought close to the north pole of another magnet, they attract".
Rule of repulsion of magnets states that "when a north pole of a magnet is brought close to the north pole of another magnet, they repel".

Page No 161:

Question 5:

One precaution you should always take while handling a magnet is not to drop it. Why?

Answer:

One precaution you should always take while handling a magnet is not to drop it because when magnets are dropped down to the floor, the impact of the drop weakens their magnetism.

Page No 161:

Question 6:

Why are magnetic keepers used to store magnets?

Answer:

A magnetic keeper is a piece of wood or soft iron which is used in storing magnets because bar magnets get demagnetised when the poles are left free for a long time. In order to preserve the magnetism of the magnets, a keeper is kept across a pair of bar magnets with unlike poles beside each other. This way a continuous path is provided for the magnetic field lines to form a loop around it.

Page No 161:

Question 1:

How will you experimentally show that there are two regions in a magnet where its magnetic strength is concentrated?

Answer:

Magnetic strength of a magnet is concentrated at the two regions namely the poles of the magnet. To show this, take a bar magnet and roll it up in a sheet of iron filings.  When we lift the bar magnet, we observe that the iron filings do not stick uniformly over its length rather, the iron filings cling to the two ends of the magnet. There are however a few in between but none in the centre of the magnet. From this experiment we can conclude that the magnetic strength is strongest at the two regions which are the two ends of the magnet, known as the poles.

Page No 161:

Question 2:

Show diagrammatically two ways in which a magnet can be freely suspended to locate directions.

Answer:

A magnet can be suspended freely to show direction either as a suspended bar magnet or as a pivoted needle mounted in a glass box.

Page No 161:

Question 7:

Which of these materials can be used to make the needle of a compass?
(a) copper
(b) aluminium
(c) steel
(d) gold

Answer:

(c) Steel 
 Steel is a magnetic material and can be used to make the needle of a compass.

Page No 161:

Question 8:

A compass needle is kept in the centre of a bar magnet. Which of the following is true?
(a) It will point in the north-south direction.
(b) It will align itself along the length of the magnet with its N pole towards the N pole of the magnet.
(c) It will not point in any specific direction.
(d) It will align itself along the length of the magnet with its S pole towards the N pole of the magnet.

Answer:

(d) It will align itself along the length of the magnet with its S pole towards the N pole of the magnet.

The north pole of the magnetic needle will be attracted to the south pole of the bar magnet and the south pole of the needle will be attracted to the north pole of the magnet. The needle will, therefore align itself with the length of the bar magnet with its S pole towards the N pole of the magnet.

Page No 161:

Question 1:

We can make a magnet with only one pole. True or false?

Answer:

False. We cannot make a magnet with only one pole. Any magnet has always two poles namely north and south.

Page No 161:

Question 2:

Like poles __________ and unlike poles ___________ each other.

Answer:

Like poles repel and unlike poles attract each other.

Page No 161:

Question 3:

The earth behaves like a huge bar magnet with its magnetic north pole near the geographical __________ Pole.

Answer:

The earth behaves like a huge bar magnet with its magnetic north pole near the geographical south pole.

Page No 161:

Question 4:

Can a magnetic north pole exist without a magnetic south pole?

Answer:

No. A magnetic north pole can never exist without a magnetic south pole. Poles always exist in pairs.

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Question 5:

You are given a piece of iron and a bar magnet. How can you magnetize the piece of iron?

Answer:

Given a piece of iron and a bar magnet, the piece of iron can be magnetised by single touch method wherein one pole of a magnet is used to stroke the iron piece from its one end to the other end repeatedly until it gets magnetised.

Page No 161:

Question 6:

The single touch method of making a magnet is extensively used nowadays to make magnets. True or false?

Answer:

False. Single touch method of making a magnet is no longer used today. Electric current is used to make magnets nowadays.

Page No 161:

Question 7:

If a magnet is heated, it can lose its magnetism. True or false?

Answer:

True. If a magnet is heated above a certain temperature, it can lose its magnetism.

Page No 161:

Question 8:

The region around a magnet where its magnetic influence can be felt is called its magnetic _____________

Answer:

The region around a magnet where its magnetic influence can be felt is called its magnetic field.

Page No 161:

Question 9:

Which instrument, based on a property of magnets, is used to find directions?

Answer:

Magnetic compass is an instrument which is based on a property of magnets to find directions.

Page No 161:

Question 10:

Iron pieces used for storing magnets are called magnetic ____________

Answer:

Iron pieces used for storing magnets are called magnetic keepers.



Page No 162:

Question 3:

Give the step-by-step method you will adopt to test if a piece of magnetic material is a magnet.

Answer:

To test whether a magnetic material is a magnet or not, the following procedure can be adopted.
1. Take a metal bar.
2. Bring one pole of a bar magnet to one end of the bar at one time and observe.
3. If it is observed that one end of the metal bar is attracted to one pole and the other end is repelled, it is confirmed that the metal bar is a magnet.
4. If it is observed that both the ends of the bar are attracted, then the metal bar is not a magnet.
5. Therefore, we can conclude that repulsion is a certain test for magnetism

Page No 162:

Question 4:

Given a bar magnet, describe the method you will use to magnetize an iron nail.

Answer:

An iron nail can be magnetised by a bar magnet by a process of single touch method. In this method, one pole of a bar magnet is used to stroke the iron nail held firmly on a surface. Stroke the iron nail from one end to the other and after reaching the other end, lift the magnet and repeat the process by bringing it back to the first end again. After about 30 strokes, you will observe that the iron nail has become a magnet when suspended freely. If the iron nail has been stroked by north pole at the first end, that end becomes the north pole while the other end becomes the south pole.

Page No 162:

Question 5:

Name and describe the instrument that uses a magnet to find direction.

Answer:

A magnetic compass is an instrument which is used to find directions. A magnetic compass consists of a magnetic needle fixed to a point in it and is made to rotate freely about that point. When there are no other magnetic materials in its vicinity, the needle points in the north–south direction. In this manner, it can be very useful to the sailors to determine directions.

Page No 162:

Question 6:

List any three uses of magnets.

Answer:

Following are the uses of magnets:
1. Automobile dynamos to produce electricity
2. Computer hard discs to store information
3. A compass to determine directions.

Page No 162:

Question 1:

Before invention of the compass, sailors used stars to find directions. In what way is using a compass better?

Answer:

A compass is a better way of locating directions because it has a magnetic needle fixed to a point which is free to rotate about that point. We know that a freely suspended magnet always rests in the north–south direction in alignment with the earth’s magnetic north –south poles. East and west are the directions which are perpendicular to the north–south. This way sailor can accurately find the directions and need not depend on the stars.

Page No 162:

Question 2:

Will a pair of bar magnets, with keepers on the two ends, act as a magnet? Try out and see for yourself.

Answer:

Yes, a pair of bar magnets with keepers on two ends will act as a magnet. A keeper is a soft iron or steel piece which when kept across the poles of the magnet behaves like a temporary magnet. It helps in conserving the magnetism of the magnets by providing an uninterrupted path for the magnetic field lines to form a loop. Since, there is magnetic field, a pair of magnets with stoppers will act as magnets also.

Page No 162:

Question 3:

Maglev train is a type of train that moves while floating in air just above its track. This way friction is minimized and the train moves very fast−at speeds exceeding 500 km per hour. How do you think it is made to float above the rails?

Answer:

Maglev trains float above the rails because in these trains, the conventional wheels of the train and the tracks on which they move are replaced by magnets. It is the repulsion property of these magnets which make the Maglev trains float over the tracks. As the train begins to move, the two magnets repel each other as like poles repel. When the magnets repel each other, train is held above its track and as the friction is minimised, the train can reach very high speeds.

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Question 4:

Given a bar magnet, how will you find tthe west direction?

Answer:

A bar magnet when suspended freely, always points in the north–south direction. Once the north and south directions are known, the direction of west and east can be easily found. West and east are the directions which are perpendicular to the north-south. West direction is towards the left of the north direction.



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