Living Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 7 Living And Non Living are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Living And Non Living are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Living And Non Living Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Living Science Book of class 6 Science Chapter 7 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Living Science Solutions. All Living Science Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 73:

Question 1:

The wood of which a wooden chair is made
(a) is living.
(b) is non-living.
(c) was once living but is now dead.
(d) was once dead but is now living.

Answer:

(c) was once living but is now dead.

The tree from which the wood is obtained was once living. Therefore, the wood of which a wooden chair is made was once living but is now dead.

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Question 2:

Which of these do all living organisms have?
(a) bones
(b) muscles
(c) cells
(d) skin

Answer:

(c) cells

The structural unit of every living organism is a cell. Thus, all living organisms have cells.

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Question 3:

In Plants, respiration occurs
(a) during the day only.
(b) during the night only.
(c) during day and night.
(d) only when photosynthesis does not take place.

Answer:

(c) during day and night

Plants respire both during day and by night. However, during the day, the amount of oxygen given out by the plant through the process of photosynthesis far exceeds the amount of oxygen used by the plant for respiration.

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Question 4:

Which of these is not a product of excretion?
(a) sweat
(b) urine
(c) energy
(d) carbon dioxide

Answer:

(c) energy

Sweat, urine and carbon dioxide are various excretion products. Energy is not.



Page No 74:

Question 1:

Why do animals move around?

Answer:

Animals move around in search of food, shelter and to escape from predators or enemies.

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Question 2:

Give an example of movement in plants.

Answer:

Example of movement in plants: A sunflower turns its face towards the sun due to phototropism.

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Question 3:

What are cells? Are all living things made up of cells?

Answer:

Cells are the fundamental units of all living organisms. Yes, all living things are made up of cells. In addition, some living organisms are just single celled (unicellular organisms).

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Question 4:

There is some growth in unicellular organisms. How do they grow?

Answer:

Unicellular organisms show some growth by an increase in the size of the single cell that constitutes the organism.

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Question 5:

Give an example of a stimulus and a response.

Answer:

Example of a stimulus and a response: If you accidentally touch a hot object, you automatically withdraw your hand. The heat of the hot object is the stimulus and you, withdrawing your hand is the response to the stimulus.

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Question 6:

How are autotrophs different from heterotrophs?

Answer:

Autotrophs Heterotrophs
They prepare their own food by the process of photosynthesis. They depend upon other organisms for food.
Example: Green plants Example: Animals

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Question 7:

All living things take in oxygen. What function does oxygen perform in the body?

Answer:

The oxygen taken in by living things during breathing is combined with the food that is digested by them to produce energy.

Page No 74:

Question 8:

Name three waste products that we excrete.

Answer:

The three waste products that we excrete are:

  1. Sweat
  2. Urine
  3. Exhaled air

Page No 74:

Question 1:

Explain with an example what is meant by 'living things respond to stimuli'.

Answer:


Living things respond to changes in their environment. For example, if you touch the leaves of the Mimosa (touch-me-not) plant, the leaves droop. In this case, the plant is responding to the stimulus of touch by drooping its leaves.

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Question 2:

How do living things grow? Some non-living things also grow. How is their growth different from the growth of living things?

Answer:


Living things grow by the division of cells. Unicellular organisms such as Amoebae grow by an increase in the size of the single cell that makes up the organism.
Non-living things grow by the addition of material from outside. For example, a pile of sand will grow if more sand is added to it.

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Question 3:

List three ways in which living things reproduce, giving one example of each.

Answer:

Three ways in which living things reproduce are:

  1. Some living things produce buds which grow into new organisms. For example, potatoes produce buds, known as eyes which grow into new potato plants.
  2. Mammals such as humans give birth directly to young ones.
  3. Some snakes, birds and crocodiles lay eggs and the young ones hatch from the egg.

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Question 4:

List four different ways in which organisms carry out exchange of gases for respiration, with one example of each.

Answer:

All living organisms exchange gases with the environment. The means are as follows:

  1. Fishes respire using their gills.
  2. Earthworms use their skin for respiration.
  3. Insects such as cockroaches breathe through several tracheal tubes in their bodies.
  4. Humans and many other animals such as cows, goats etc. respire through external nostrils, which supplies air to their lungs.

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Question 5:

Explain phototropism and geotropism in plants. Are there any similar examples in the animal world also?

Answer:

If a plant is potted near a window, its stem will bend toward the light as it grows. The growth of a plant towards light is known as phototropism. In the same way, the roots of plants grow towards the earth and the stem grows in the opposite direction. This is an example of geotropism.

In animals, cockroaches and earthworms show negative phototropism. They move away from light. In the same way, Paramecium swims in the opposite direction of the Earth's gravity and shows negative geotropism.

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Question 6:

Explain giving examples what you mean by a 'species'.

Answer:

Each type of living organism has many individuals which are broadly similar to each other. Individuals may differ slightly but their behaviour, habits or appearance are quite similar. Such a group constitutes a species. Members of a species inhabit the same environment, eat the same kind of food and reproduce among themselves.

For example, all pigs are a species, humans form a species, oak trees are a species of trees etc.

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Question 5:

During which process is energy released?
(a) respiration
(b) feeding
(c) digestion
(d) growth

Answer:

(a) respiration

During respiration, the oxygen inhaled reacts with digested food to produce energy.

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Question 6:

The size of an organisms is primarily dependent on
(a) number of cells in its body.
(b) size of cells in its body.
(c) space between cells in its body.
(d) amount of water in its body.

Answer:

(a) number of cells in its body

The size of an animal primarily depends upon the number of cells in its body.

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Question 7:

A cockroach breathes through
(a) gills.
(b) lungs.
(c) nostrils.
(d) holes in its body.

Answer:

(d) holes in its body

A cockroach breathes through holes in its body known as trachael tubes.

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Question 8:

If a potted plant is kept near a window from where light is coming in, the tip of the plant
(a) grows towards the window.
(b) grows away from the window.
(c) grows straight up.
(d) does not grow.

Answer:

(a) grows towards the window

Plants grow in the direction of sunlight. This is known as phototropic movement.

Page No 74:

Question 1:

All living things move and all non-living things do not move. True or false?

Answer:

False. There are some non-living objects such as cars, buses, aircraft, ships and machinery that can move when an external force is applied to them.

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Question 2:

Which of these grow throughout their life−plants or animals?

Answer:

Animals generally stop growing after reaching a certain age or size. However, plants continue to grow throughout their life.

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Question 3:

What is the process of removal of waste products from the body called?

Answer:

The process of removal of waste products from the body is known as excretion.

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Question 4:

When oxygen and food combine in the bodies of living organisms they produce _____________

Answer:

When oxygen and food combine in the bodies of living organisms they produce energy.

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Question 5:

Name a one-celled living organism.

Answer:

Amoeba is an example of a one-celled (unicellular) living organism.

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Question 6:

If one living organism can reproduce with another, they belong to the same ___________

Answer:

If one living organism can reproduce with another, they belong to the same species.

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Question 7:

Members of different species can reproduce among themselves. True or false?

Answer:

False.
Only members of the same species can reproduce among themselves.



Page No 75:

Question 1:

Plants take in oxygen and give out carbon dioxide during respiration all the time. Why do we then say that plants supply oxygen to the air?

Answer:

During the day, plants use carbon dioxide from the air for photosynthesis and give out oxygen. The amount of oxygen given out by a plant during photosynthesis far exceeds the amount of oxygen consumed by the plant and converted into carbon dioxide by respiration. Therefore, we say that plants supply oxygen to the air.

Page No 75:

Question 2:

A car 'eats' fuel, 'breathes' air, 'excretes' smoke and 'moves' from place to place. Why is it not considered to be living?

Answer:

A car is not living because:

  1. A car is not made up of cells. It is made up of the atoms and molecules of steel, plastic, etc.
  2. A car does not grow.
  3. A car cannot respond to stimulus.
  4. A car cannot reproduce.

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Question 3:

Are living things matter?

Answer:

All living things have a mass and they occupy volume. Therefore, all living things are matter.

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Question 4:

Why does the population of animals living in jungles not increase as quickly as the human population does?

Answer:

In jungles, there are many pressures for survival. The most important of which is finding of food and water. Humans have managed to domesticate animals, farm for food crops, vegetables and fruits and harness rivers to provide water. Thus, humans have very little limitations in terms of food and water. Further, humans have access to medical care to cure diseases that may kill animals in the jungle. As a result, human population increases much more quickly than the population of animals living in jungles.

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Question 5:

Cells are made up of molecules. Why then do we say that the structural unit of a living thing is a cell, and not a molecule?

Answer:

Living organisms show specific characteristics such as growth, response to stimulus and other life functions. The cell is the basic unit which shows all the life functions. However, molecules do not show the basic life functions. Molecules are the ingredients of life, but they are not alive, cells.
As a result, the cell is the unit of a living being.



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