Living Science Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 1 Sources Of Food are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Sources Of Food are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Sources Of Food Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Living Science Book of class 6 Science Chapter 1 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Living Science Solutions. All Living Science Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 11:

Question 1:

Name the sources from where we get the ingredients used in food.

Answer:

Following are the sources from where we get the ingredients used in food:
(i) Plants
(ii) Animals
(iii) Minerals

Page No 11:

Question 2:

Why are green plants known as producers?

Answer:

Green plants use sunlight and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere to produce carbohydrates by the process of photosynthesis. Since, plants produce food for themselves, they are known as producers.

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Question 3:

Name three plants and their parts that we eat.

Answer:

Example of edible plants are:

  1. Banana: The fruit is edible. The centre of stem is also eaten. Less commonly, the flowers of the banana tree is also used as food.
  2. Carrot: It is the root of the carrot plant.
  3. Rice: The grains of rice that are eaten are the seeds of the rice plant.

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Question 4:

In what way is a scavenger useful to the environment?

Answer:

Scavenger consumes dead organisms and prevent them from accumulating in the environment, which may lead to the outbreak of diseases. Therefore, scavengers keep the environment clean. For example, termites consume the remains of dead plants, while vultures consume dead animals.

Page No 11:

Question 1:

Which of these is obtained from plants?
(a) honey
(b) curd
(c) rice
(d) egg

Answer:

(c) rice
Rice is obtained directly from plants. Honey is created by bees. Curd is obtained from milk. Eggs are obtained from chicken, ducks or domesticated birds.

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Question 2:

Which of these is obtained from animals?
(a) pulses
(b) cheese
(c) cereals
(d) sugar

Answer:

(b) Cheese
Cheese is obtained from milk which is obtained from animals such as cows, goats or buffaloes. However, pulses, cereals and sugar are obtained from plants.

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Question 3:

Which of these food ingredients do we not get from plants or animals?
(a) salt
(b) honey
(c) milk
(d) wheat

Answer:

(a) Salt
Salt is obtained neither from animals nor from plants. Salt is either obtained by evaporating sea water or it is mined from salt mines.

Page No 11:

Question 4:

The first link in all food chains is
(a) herbivores.
(b) carnivores.
(c) plants.
(d) omnivores.

Answer:

(c) Plants
The first link in any food chain are the plants. All other organisms in the food chain depend upon plants either directly, as in herbivores, or indirectly such as omnivores or carnivores for nutrition.

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Question 5:

Which of these eats food digested by other animals?
(a) a cow
(b) a lion
(c) a cockroach
(d) a tapeworm

Answer:

(d) a tapeworm
Parasites eat food that is already digested by the host. The tapeworm is an intestinal parasite affecting human beings. Tapeworm infections are caused most commonly by the consumption of under cooked meat, fish or poultry.

Page No 11:

Question 6:

Which of these animals does have teeth?
(a) snake
(b) eagle
(c) mosquito
(d) tapeworm

Answer:

(a) Snake

Snakes have teeth while eagles, mosquitoes and tapeworms do not. All snakes, whether venomous or non-venomous, have teeth to help them hold down and swallow prey. In venomous snakes, there are modified teeth used to inject venom, known as fangs.

Page No 11:

Question 1:

Name one stem that has food stored in it.

Answer:

Potato is an example of a stem that has food stored in it.

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Question 2:

Are humans herbivores, carnivores or omnivores?

Answer:

Humans are omnivores as they consume both plant and animal products.

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Question 3:

Some animals usually eat the dead bodies of other animals. What are they called?

Answer:

Animals that feed upon dead bodies of other animals are known as scavengers.

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Question 4:

Some food chains end at herbivores. True or false?

Answer:

True. In case of herbivores with no natural predators, the food chain ends at the herbivore.

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Question 5:

The chemical substances in food that your body needs are called

Answer:

The chemical substances in food that your body needs are called nutrients.

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Question 6:

Do all living things eat the same kind of food?

Answer:

No, all living things do not eat the same kind of food.



Page No 12:

Question 5:

Why does a mosquito not have teeth?

Answer:

Mosquitoes rely upon a liquid diet of either sap or nectar from plants (male mosquitoes) or blood (female mosquitoes carrying eggs). Since mosquitoes do not consume solids, they do not have teeth.

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Question 6:

We get our food items from plants and animals. Do you agree? Give reasons.

Answer:

Yes, I agree that we get our food items from plants and animals. All the foods that we eat are either derived from plants such as fruits, grains, vegetables, nuts etc., or they are derived from animals such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese butter etc.

Page No 12:

Question 1:

How is honey made?

Answer:


Following are the steps involved in producing honey are:

  1. Field bees, fly out from the honeycomb to find flowers and blossoms. They fly from flower to flower and suck out the nectar using their specially adapted tongues. Nectar is stored in special sacs in their bodies.
  2. Once the field bees return to the honeycomb, the nectar they bring back is eaten by house bees, which add enzymes from their bodies to the nectar that turns the nectar into honey.
  3. The house bees then regurgitate (remove from their bodies by spitting out through their mouths) the honey, which is stored in the cells of the honeycomb.

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Question 2:

Explain the difference between herbivores, carnivores and omnivores.

Answer:

The difference between herbivores, carnivores and omnivores are as follows:
 

Herbivore Carnivore   Omnivore
Herbivorous animals  feed on plants. Carnivorous animals eat the flesh of other animals. An omnivorous animal can eat both plants and also other animals.
Herbivorous animals have sharp cutting teeth in front of their mouths and flat grinding teeth at the rear of their mouths Carnivorous animals have well developed sharp teeth, known as canines to help tear the flesh of prey. Carnivorous animals also have claws to hold on to prey. Omnivorous animals have teeth in between that of herbivores and carnivores. They have sharp teeth to tear meat, but also posses flat grinding teeth to crush plants.
Examples of herbivores include cows, goats, buffaloes, deer, zebra etc. Examples of carnivores include lions, tigers, eagles, leopards etc. Examples of omnivores include humans, pigs, bears etc.

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Question 3:

What are the functions of food?

Answer:

The main functions of food are as follows:

  1. Food is a source of energy to the body. When we work with our bodies and perform activities like thinking, running, walking, jumping etc., we use the energy obtained from food.
  2. The nutrients contained in food help the body grow and also repair itself by replacing dead and worn out cells.
  3. The nutrients contained in food also help the body's immune system to safeguards the body against various diseases.

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Question 4:

What is a food chain? Explain with an example.

Answer:

A food chain is a sequence that shows how each living organism gets its food in a particular environment.
Example:

Plantsgrasshopper shrew owl

  1. In the food chain shown, plants prepare food from sunlight, using carbon dioxide from the air by the process of photosynthesis. Since, the plant produces its own food, it is a producer.
  2. The grasshopper eats the plants as food to get energy. It is therefore classified as a primary consumer.
  3. A secondary consumer such as a shrew eats the grasshopper. As a result, a shrew lies one level above the grasshopper in the food chain.
  4. The shrew in turn is food for a tertiary consumer such as an owl. In the example shown, the owl is at the uppermost level of the food chain.

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Question 5:

How are the teeth of carnivores different from those of herbivores?

Answer:

Carnivorous animals eat the flesh of other animals, while herbivorous animals eat plants. The teeth of carnivorous animals are adapted to tearing flesh and are usually long and sharp that serve an added function of puncturing vital organs and killing the prey.
The teeth of herbivorous animals are adapted to cutting and tearing leaves from plants and then crushing them. Therefore, herbivores have sharp front teeth to enable them to cut leaves and flat teeth at the rear of their mouth to enable them to crush the leaves or other plant material that is usually quite tough and fibrous.

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Question 6:

What are parasites? Explain giving two examples.

Answer:

Parasites are organisms that depend upon other organisms for their food. The organism that a parasite depends upon for food is known as the host. The parasite is usually harmful to the health of the host and can even kill the host. Some examples of parasites are:

  1. The Cuscuta plant is a parasitic plant that grows on other plants and inserts its root like projections known as haustoria into the host plant to suck out nutrients from the host plant. The Cuscuta plant does not have well developed leaves and relies mostly upon its host for obtaining food.
  2. Mosquitoes, leeches and bed bugs are examples of parasites that survive on blood that they suck from humans and other animals. Since, these parasites live outside the body of the host, they are called ecto-parasites.

Page No 12:

Question 1:

Both carnivores and parasites depend on other animals for food. In what way is a carnivore different from a parasite?

Answer:

 

Differences between carnivores and parasites
Carnivores   Parasites
Carnivores kill their prey to consume them. Parasites may kill their hosts slowly by weakening them. In general however, parasites need not kill their hosts.  
Carnivores generally do not cause diseases in their prey. Parasites may cause diseases in their hosts.
Carnivores are always external to their prey. Parasites may be inside their hosts (endoparasites) or outside their host (ectoparasites).
Carnivores can be larger or smaller than their prey.   Parasites are generally much smaller than their hosts.
Carnivores reproduce very slowly compared to their prey. Parasites reproduce very rapidly compared to their prey.
Examples of carnivores include, lions, tigers, leopards, eagles etc.  Examples of endoparasites are: intestinal worms such as Ascaris, tapeworm, ringworm, etc. Examples of ectoparasites are mosquitoes, bed bugs, leeches, etc.

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Question 2:

Humans eat both plants and animals. Which teeth in humans are suitable for tearing flesh?

Answer:

Humans are omnivores and eat both plant and animal derived foods. Humans have canine teeth that are suitable for tearing flesh. However, canines are not well developed in humans as they are in carnivorous animals such as lions or tigers.

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Question 3:

A food chain consists of several organisms. Suppose one of the organisms in the chain disappears. What effect can this have on the other organisms in the food chain?

Answer:

If one of the organisms in the food chain disappears, then the entire food chain will collapse as the flow of the nutrition will get altered and that will eventually cause death of other organisms of that food chain that are at higher levels.



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