Science In Everyday Life Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 2 Components Of Food are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Components Of Food are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Components Of Food Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Science In Everyday Life Book of class 6 Science Chapter 2 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Science In Everyday Life Solutions. All Science In Everyday Life Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 33:

Question 1:

Write two examples for each of the following.

1. Plant sources of proteins ......................... .........................
2. Water-soluble vitamins ......................... .........................
3. Fat-soluble vitamins ......................... .........................
4. Macrominerals ......................... .........................
5. Trace minerals ......................... .........................

Answer:

1. Plant sources of proteins: Pulses and soya beans
2. Water-soluble vitamins: Vitamin B complex and vitamin C
3. Fat-soluble vitamins: Vitamin A and vitamin K
4. Macrominerals: Calcium and magnesium
5. Trace minerals: Iron and zinc

Page No 33:

Question 2:

Write one word for the following.
1. Simple carbohydrates .........................
2. Complex carbohydrates .........................
3. Minerals that are needed by the body in larger amounts .........................
4. Portion of the plant food that do not provide any nutrients to out body .........................
5. A condition caused by excess loss of water .........................
6. Disease caused due to deficiency of proteins .........................
7. Malnutrition caused due to deficiency of proteins along with carbohydrate .........................
8. Disease caused by deficiency of iodine in the diet .........................

Answer:

1. Simple carbohydrates: Sugars
2. Complex carbohydrates: Starch
3. Minerals that are needed by the body in large amounts: Macro minerals
4. Portion of plant food that do not provide any nutrients for our body: Roughage 
5. A condition caused by excessive loss of water: Dehydration
6. Disease caused by a deficiency of proteins: Kwashiorkor 
7. Malnutrition caused by a deficiency of proteins along with carbohydrates: Protein-energy malnutrition 
8. Disease caused by a deficiency of iodine in the diet: Goitre 

Page No 33:

Question 1:

Write T for the true statement and F for the false one. Correct the false statements(s).
1. There are three main nutrients present in food.
2. Plants store energy in the form of starch.
3. Saturated fats are normally liquid at room temperature.
4. Insoluble roughage helps in bood circulation.
5. Excess loss of water from the body causes constipation.

Answer:

1. There are three main nutrients present in food.
False. There are six main nutrients present in food, viz. carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and dietary fibres.

2. Plants store energy in the form of starch.
True. Plants store energy in the form of starch.

3. Saturated fats are normally liquid at room temperature.
False. Saturated fats are normally solid at room temperature.

4. Insoluble roughage helps in blood circulation.
True. Insoluble roughage helps in blood circulation.

5. Excess loss of water from the body causes constipation.
False. Excessive loss of water from the body causes dehydration.

Page No 33:

Question 1:

Which of the following is a source of simple carbohydrate?
(a) Fruits and honey
(b) Fruits and potato
(c) Honey and corn
(d) Corn and potato

Answer:

(a) Fruits and honey

Fruits and honey are sources of simple sugars called carbohydrates.

Page No 33:

Question 2:

Which of the following nutrient is needed by our body for muscle-building?
(a) Carbohydrates
(b) Proteins
(c) Fats
(d) Dietary fibers

Answer:

(b) Proteins

Proteins help in forming muscles, and are thus needed by our body for muscle-building.

Page No 33:

Question 3:

Which of the following food groups should be included in a balanced diet?
(a) Only milk and meat group
(b) Only fruit adn vegetable group
(c) Only grain group
(d) All of these

Answer:

(d) All of these

A balanced diet consists of proteins, carbohydrates, fats and fibres. Therefore, all the above-mentioned groups should be included in a balanced diet.

Page No 33:

Question 4:

Deficiency of which two nutrients is called Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM)?
(a) Proteins and fats
(b) Carbohydrates and proteins
(c) Fats and proteins
(d) Carbohydrates and fats

Answer:

(b) Carbohydrates and proteins

Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is caused by a combined deficiency of carbohydrates and proteins. It may lead to marasmus.

Page No 33:

Question 5:

Deficiency of which vitamin causes night blindness?
(a) A
(b) C
(c) D
(d) K

Answer:

(a) A

Deficiency of vitamin A causes night blindness.



Page No 34:

Question 1:

Name the six main nutrients present in food, with one example of its source.

Answer:

The six main nutrients present in food along with their sources are as follows.

  • Proteins: Meat, fish
  • Carbohydrates: Honey, fruits
  • Fats: Nuts, oil
  • Vitamins: Spinach, fruits
  • Minerals: Dairy products, iodised salt
  • Roughage: Whole grains, fruits

Page No 34:

Question 2:

Differentiate between the two major types of carbohydrates in food.

Answer:

The two kinds of carbohydrates present in food are simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates.
 

Simple carbohydrates Complex carbohydrates
Simple carbohydrates are called sugars. Complex carbohydrates are called starch.
Their sources are fruits, honey and table sugar. Their sources are rice, wheat and corn.

Page No 34:

Question 3:

Why does our body need proteins? Name some sources of protein.

Answer:

Our body needs proteins for building muscles and repairing worn-out tissues.
Among the sources of proteins are meat, milk, fish and eggs.

Page No 34:

Question 4:

Why do we need minerals in our diet?

Answer:

We need minerals in our diet to keep our body healthy. Minerals play an important role in the formation of teeth, bones and blood cells and also help in maintaining a normal heartbeat.

Page No 34:

Question 5:

Differentiate between constipation and dehydration.

Answer:

Constipation Dehydration
Constipation is caused by a lack of insoluble roughage in the diet. Dehydration is caused by excessive loss of water from the body.
Constipation causes stools to become hard and difficult to pass. Dehydration causes stools to become watery.

Page No 34:

Question 6:

Define a balanced diet. What should a balanced diet included?

Answer:

A balanced diet is defined as a diet that contains adequate amounts of different nutrients needed for the healthy functioning of the body.
A balanced diet should include food from four groups, i.e., the milk group, meat group, fruit and vegetable group, and grain group.

Page No 34:

Question 7:

Define deficiency diseases. How are they different from other diseases?

Answer:

Deficiency diseases are caused by a lack of nutrients in the diet. They are different from other diseases as they are not transmitted from one person to another.

Page No 34:

Question 8:

What is ORS? How can it be made at home?

Answer:

ORS is oral rehydration solution. It is given to a person suffering from dehydration for recovery.
It can be made at home by mixing one tablespoon of salt and eight tablespoons of sugar in one litre of clean, drinking water.

Page No 34:

Question 1:

What are the two types of vitamins? Write a short note on each of them with examples.

Answer:

The two types of vitamins are fat-soluble vitamins and water-soluble vitamins.
a) Fat-soluble vitamins: They include vitamins A, D, E and K. They are stored in the fat tissue of our body and are used when needed by the body. Our body can synthesise vitamin D in the presence of sunlight.
b) Water-soluble vitamins: Vitamin B complex (vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, B12 and folic acid) and vitamin C are water-soluble vitamins. These are not stored in the body and are needed to be regularly supplied by consuming food items such as spinach, green vegetables and citrus fruits.

Page No 34:

Question 2:

Discuss the importance of water in our body.

Answer:

Water in our body is very important for maintaining good health. Seventy per cent of our body is made up of water. The following are some of the uses of water.

  • It provides the medium for various chemical reactions that take place in our body, such as those during digestion and excretion.
  • Our body temperature is regulated by water.
  • Water aids in the transport of substances in our body.
  • It aids in the absorption of food in the body.

Page No 34:

Question 3:

Describe the effect of protein deficiency in children.

Answer:

Protein deficiency in children leads to weakness of muscles. It causes a disease called kwashiorkor. The symptoms of kwashiorkor are as follows.
a) Pot-like belly
b) Swelling of the limbs and face
c) Stunted growth
d) Mental retardation
e) Diarrhoea
f) Skin diseases
Marasmus is caused by the deficiency of both proteins and carbohydrates.

Page No 34:

Question 4:

Name the different kinds of vitamins with their sources, functions, and deficiency diseases.

Answer:

Vitamins Sources Functions Deficiency diseases
A Green vegetables, fruits, carrots, fish Keeps hair, eyes and skin healthy Night blindness
B1 Whole grains, sprouts and eggs Helps in digestion and maintains the nervous system  Beriberi
B2 Green leafy vegetables, eggs and milk  Keeps mouth and skin healthy Skin disorders
B12 Meat  Helps form red blood cells  Anaemia
C Sprouts and citrus fruits such as lemons and oranges  Aids in fighting infection, maintains the health of teeth, gums and joints  Scurvy
D Sunlight, milk and fish  Helps in the growth of bones in children  Rickets
K Green leafy vegetables such as spinach  Aids in blood clotting  Haemorrhage

Page No 34:

Question 5:

Discuss the functions of any four minerals and what happens in case we eat food deficient in them for a long time?

Answer:

If we eat food deficient in a mineral, then we will be affected by a disease caused by a deficiency of that mineral.

 Mineral Functions Deficiency disease
Calcium Gives strength to bones and teeth and aids in blood clotting Rickets in children and osteoporosis in adults
Phosphorous Gives strength to bones and teeth Rickets in children
Iron Aids in the formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin Anaemia
Iodine Helps in the proper functioning of the thyroid gland Goitre



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