Science In Everyday Life Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 12 Fun With Magnets are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Fun With Magnets are extremely popular among class 6 students for Science Fun With Magnets Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Science In Everyday Life Book of class 6 Science Chapter 12 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Science In Everyday Life Solutions. All Science In Everyday Life Solutions for class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 156:

Question 1:

Write two examples for each of the following.

1. A magnetic material ......................... .........................
2. A non-magnetic material ......................... .........................
3. A device that uses a magnet ......................... .........................

Answer:

1. A magnetic material: Iron and nickel
2. A non-magnetic material: Wood and plastic
3. A device that uses a magnet: Television and computer monitor

Page No 156:

Question 2:

Define the following.
1. Magnetic compass
2. Repulsion
3. Temporary magnet
4. Permanent magnet

Answer:

1. Magnetic compass
An instrument with a magnet that is used to find directions is called magnetic compass.
2. Repulsion
When like poles of the magnet (N–N or S–S) are brought close to each other, they repel. This is called repulsion.
3. Temporary magnet
Magnets that retain their properties only for a short period of time are called temporary magnets.
4. Permanent magnet
Magnets that retain their magnetic properties for a long period of time are called permanent magnets.

Page No 156:

Question 1:

How many poles does a magnet have?
(a) One
(b) Two
(c) Three
(d) There is no limit to the number poles

Answer:

(b) two
A magnet has two poles:
1. North pole
2. South pole

Page No 156:

Question 2:

A magnetic compass is generally used
(a) to draw a circle
(b) to make other magnets
(c) to find directions
(d) to attract iron

Answer:

(c) to find directions
A magnetic compass has a small needle at its centre that can rotate freely and always points in the Earth's ​north–south direction.

Page No 156:

Question 3:

The North Pole of a magnet will attract
(a) the North Pole of another magnet
(b) the South Pole of another magnet
(c) any pole of another magnet
(d) none of the above

Answer:

(b) the South Pole of another magnet
When unlike poles of the magnet are brought close to each other, they attract.

Page No 156:

Question 4:

The Earth acts like a giant
(a) horseshoe magnet
(b) bar magnet
(c) electromagnet
(d) the earth does not act like a magnet at all

Answer:

(b) bar magnet
It is because of this feature a freely suspended magnet always points in the earth's ​north–south direction.

Page No 156:

Question 5:

Which of the following materials is most appropriate to make a good temporary magnet?
(a) iron
(b) cotton
(c) glass
(d) wood

Answer:

(a) iron
Iron behaves like a magnet only when it is brought near a strong magnet, but it quickly loses its magnetic property if the influence of the strong magnet is removed.

Page No 156:

Question 1:

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.
1. Only ..................... (magnetic/non-magnetic) materials are attracted by magnets.
2. Like poles of two magnets ..................... (attract/repel) each other.
3. A magnet that retains its properties for a very long period of time is called ..................... (electro/permanent) magnet.
4. A horseshoe magnet should be stored with a piece of ..................... (plastic/iron) across its poles.
5. A ......................................... (credit card/magnetic compass) is a devicer used to find directions.

Answer:

1.Only magnetic materials are attracted by magnets.
2. Like poles of two magnets repel each other.
3. A magnet that retains its properties for a very long period of time is called permanent magnet.
4. A horseshoe magnet should be stored with a piece of iron across its poles.
5. A magnetic compass is a device used to find directions.



Page No 157:

Question 1:

Name the part of a magnet where the magnetic force is the strongest.

Answer:

Magnetic forces are at its strongest at the poles. There are two types of poles in every magnet: North Pole and South Pole.

Page No 157:

Question 2:

What would happen to the poles of a bar magnet if the bar was broken into two pieces?

Answer:

If we break a bar magnet into two pieces, each part will have a north pole and a south pole. It is so because two poles cannot exist independently.

Page No 157:

Question 3:

Name two materials that can be used to make a temporary magnet.

Answer:

Iron and cobalt can be used to make a temporary magnet. These materials behave like magnets only when they are near a strong magnet.

Page No 157:

Question 4:

Name two materials that can be used to make a permanent magnet.

Answer:

Permanent magnets can be made by using mixtures of iron and cobalt with other materials. These mixtures make strong magnets.

Page No 157:

Question 5:

What is the correct way of storing: (a) bar magnets (b) horseshoe magnets?

Answer:

(a) Bar magnets should be stored in pairs with unlike poles alongside each other.
(b) Horseshoe magnets should be stored with a piece of soft iron kept across their poles.

Page No 157:

Question 6:

Name any two modern devices in which magnets are used.

Answer:

The two modern devices in which magnets are used are (1) television and (2) computer.

Page No 157:

Question 1:

Explain briefly how you would classify objects as magnetic or non-magnetic if you are given a bar magnet.

Answer:

If we are given a bar magnet, we would classify objects as magnetic or non-magnetic as given below:
Magnetic objects
Objects that are attracted by the given bar magnet are said to be magnetic.
Non-magnetic objects
Objects that are not attracted by the given bar magnet are said to be non-magnetic.

Page No 157:

Question 2:

If you are given some iron filings and a magnet, describe how you would find the poles of the magnet.

Answer:

1. Spread the iron fillings on a sheet of white paper and wrap the magnet in the polythene sheet.
2. Run this magnet through the iron fillings.
Now you will see that most of the iron filings stick to two portions of the magnet.
These two portions of the magnet where most of the iron filings stick are the poles of the magnet.

Page No 157:

Question 3:

Explain how one can find directions using a magnetic compass.

Answer:

A magnetic compass is an instrument that is used to find the directions. Different directions (north, south, east and west) are marked on the compass.
We know that our Earth is considered as a huge bar magnet with its North and South Poles aligned along the geographical South and North Poles, respectively. Hence, the North Pole of the magnetised needle in a magnetic compass is attracted towards Earth’s geographic North Pole. Similarly, the South Pole of the magnetised needle is attracted towards Earth’s geographic South Pole. Hence, the magnetised needle of a magnetic compass always aligns itself along the north–south direction. Thus, in this way we can read the desired direction on the compass.

Page No 157:

Question 4:

Describe a simple experiment to show that a freely suspended magnet always aligns itself in a particular direction.

Answer:

We need a ruler, a table, a bar magnet, a string, a magnetic compass and a sheet of white paper for this experiment.
The steps taken are as follows:
1. Stick the sheet of white paper on the table and place a magnetic compass on it.
2. Mark the ​north‒south directions on the paper with the help of compass.
3. Tie one end of the string to the middle portion of the bar magnet and other to the ruler.
4. Place the ruler on the table so that the magnet can move freely.
After leaving the magnet undisturbed for a little while, we will note the direction in which it comes to rest.
When we compare this with the directions marked on the paper, we will see that the magnet aligns itself towards north–south direction. If we give the magnet a twist, then we will observe this alignment once again.



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