Science In Everyday Life Solutions for Class 6 Science Chapter 8 Getting To Know Our Plants are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Getting To Know Our Plants are extremely popular among Class 6 students for Science Getting To Know Our Plants Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Science In Everyday Life Book of Class 6 Science Chapter 8 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Science In Everyday Life Solutions. All Science In Everyday Life Solutions for class Class 6 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 104:

Question 1:

Write two examples for each of the following.

1. Plants with tap root ................... ...................
2. Plants with fibrous root ................... ...................
3. Plants with climbing roots ................... ...................
4. Plants with prop roots ................... ...................
5. Plants with thorns ................... ...................
6. Plants with tendrils ................... ...................

Answer:

1. Plants with taproots: Turnip and beetroot
2. Plants with fibrous roots: Onion and wheat
3. Plants with climbing roots: Money plant and black pepper
4. Plants with prop roots: Bamboo and sugarcane
5. Plants with thorns: Bougainvillaea and rose
6. Plants with tendrils: Grapes and passion flower

Page No 104:

Question 2:

Write one word for the following.

1. Roots growing from the base of the stem ..............................
2. The green coloured pigment foudn in leaves ..............................
3. The flat green part of the leaf ..............................
4. The arrangement of veins in a leaf ..............................
5. The loss of water through stomata ..............................
6. The male reproductive part of a flower ..............................
7. A powdery substance produced by anthers  

Answer:

1. Roots growing from the base of the stem: Fibrous roots
2. The green-coloured pigment found in leaves: Chlorophyll
3. The flat green part of the leaf: Lamina
4. The arrangement of veins in a leaf: Venation
5. The loss of water through stomata: Transpiration
6. The male reproductive part of a flower: Stamen
7. A powdery substance produced by anther: Pollen

Page No 104:

Question 1:

Which of the following plants has a tap root?
(a) Turnip
(b) Grass
(c) Maize
(d) Wheat

Answer:

(a) turnip
Turnip has true roots called tap roots.

Page No 104:

Question 2:

Which of the following is a function of roots?
(a) Anchoring the plant
(b) Photosynthesis
(c) Protection
(d) Transpiration

Answer:

(a) anchoring the plant
The main function of roots is to anchor the plant in the soil.

Page No 104:

Question 3:

At which of these points do new leaves arise?
(a) Nodes
(b) Internodes
(c) Prop roots
(d) None of these

Answer:

(a) nodes
New leaves arise from the nodes of stem.

Page No 104:

Question 4:

Which of the following plants has tendrils to provide support?
(a) Mango
(b) Passion flower
(c) Carrot
(d) Cactus

Answer:

(b) passion flower
Passion flower is a climber and therefore has tendrils to provide support.

Page No 104:

Question 5:

Which of the following is the female reproductive part of a plant?
(a) Stamen
(b) Carpel
(c) Sepal
(d) Petal

Answer:

(b) carpel
Carpel or pistil is the female reproduction part of a plant.

Page No 104:

Question 1:

Match the following.

Column A Column B
Dodder Protect the flower
Bamboo Bougainvillea
Potato Prop roots
Sharp prickles Parasitic roots
Sepals Tuber

Answer:

Column A Column B
Dodder Parasitic roots
Bamboo Prop roots
Potato Tuber
Sharp prickles Bougainvillaea
Sepals Protect the flower



Page No 105:

Question 1:

What are the two main types of root system?

Answer:

Following are the two main types of root system:

  • Taproot system: In taproot system, a single root grows from the seed after germination. Example: Mango and turnip.
  • Fibrous root system: In fibrous root system, the roots grow from the base of the stem. Example: Grass, maize and wheat.

Page No 105:

Question 2:

Name any three root modifications with examples.

Answer:

The three root modification with examples are as follows:

  • Storage roots meant for storage of food, e.g., radish and carrot.
  • Prop roots for providing support, e.g., bamboo and sugarcane.
  • Roots for climbing, e.g., money plant and black pepper.

Page No 105:

Question 3:

What is venation? What are the two types of ventation?

Answer:

Venation is arrangement of veins in the leaf.
The two types of venation are parallel venation and reticulate venation.

Page No 105:

Question 4:

Define transpiration. How does it help a plant?

Answer:

Transpiration is the process of losing water from the surface of the leaf through stomata. Transpiration helps a plant in cooling the leaves and transporting the nutrients.

Page No 105:

Question 5:

List any two leaf modifications with examples.

Answer:

The leaf modification are as follows:

  • Tendrils: Tendrils are leaf modification in some plants that help the plant to attach itself to a wall or other support. Example: Pea and grape.
  • Spines: Leaves are modified in spines in certain plants in order to provide protection and prevent loss of water. Example: Cactus and rose.

Page No 105:

Question 6:

Define pollination. What happens to a flower after pollination?

Answer:

Pollination is the process of transfer of pollen grains from an anther to a stigma. After pollination, the ovule in flower fertilises into a seed and the ovary develops into a fruit.

Page No 105:

Question 7:

Differentiate between stamen and carpel of a flower.

Answer:

Stamen Carpel
It is the male reproductive organ of a flower. It is the female reproductive organ of a flower.
It has two parts—i.e., stamen and anther. It has three parts—i.e., stigma, style and ovary.
Pollens are produced in anthers. Ovules are present in ovary and later ferilise into seeds.

Page No 105:

Question 1:

List out the different functions of a root.

Answer:

The different functions of a root are as follows:

  • Anchorage of plant: Roots hold the plant tight in the ground and help it to anchor firmly in the soil.
  • Absorption of water and minerals from the soil: Roots of plants are the site of absorption of water and nutrients from the soil.
  • Prevention of soil erosion: Roots hold the soil particles together and prevent them from being carried away by wind or water.

Page No 105:

Question 2:

List out the important functions of a stem.

Answer:

The important functions of a stem are as follows:

  • Stem keeps leaves in position and aids in their spreading as stems and branches grow. This makes sure that leaves get enough light to photosynthesise.
  • Green stem has chlorophyll and therefore can photosynthesise.
  • Stem helps in conduction of water and minerals from roots to leaves and transport of food from leaves to roots.
  • Flowers, fruits and leaf buds are attached to the stem.

Page No 105:

Question 3:

Describe the various stem modifications and their functions.

Answer:

The various stem modifications and their functions are as follows:

  • To store water: Stems swell up to store water, e.g., jade and cactus.
  • To manufacture food: Leaf-like flattened stems can perform photosynthesis, e.g., cactus.
  • To give protection: Stems are modified as thorns (Bougainvillaea) and sharp prickles (rose) to provide protection to plants from being eaten by animals.
  • To give support: Stems are modified as tendrils to provide support, e.g., grape and passion flower.
  • To store food: Stems are modified to store food, e.g., onion and potato.

Page No 105:

Question 4:

With the help of a well-labelled diagram, describe the structure of a leaf.

Answer:

A leaf has the following parts:

  • Lamina: A flat green portion of the leaf, also known as leaf blade.
  • Petiole: A narrow stalk-like structure that connects leaf to stem.
  • Vein: A network of branching that provides framework.
  • Midrib: A central vein of the leaf and continuation of the petiole.

Page No 105:

Question 5:

Describe in detail the different functions of a leaf.

Answer:

The different functions of a leaf are as follows:

  • The leaves have green pigment called chlorophyll that can fix sunlight and can make their own food by utilising water and carbon dioxide as raw material. This process is known as photosynthesis.
  • The leaves have tiny pores called stomata on their surface that helps in exchange of gases in plants.
  • The leaves lose water from their surface through stomata. This is called transpiration. Transpiration helps to keep the leaves cool and to transport the water and minerals from roots to leaves.

Page No 105:

Question 6:

Describe the structure of a typical flower with a well-labelled diagram.

Answer:

A typical flower has following parts:

  • Stamen: It is a male reproductive organ of the flower. It has two parts: filament (thin stalk) and anther (knob-like structure). Pollen, a powdery substance, is produced in anthers.
  • Carpel: It is a female reproductive part of a flower, also known as pistil. It has three parts—i.e., stigma (sticky top), ovary (enlarged base) and style (stalk connecting ovary and stigma). Ovary contains ovules, which fertilises into seeds.
  • Petal: It is a colourful structure that surrounds the inner parts of a flower.
  • Sepal: It is a leaf-like green structure present at the base of a flower.



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