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Page No 221:

Question 1:

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.
1. Radish is an example of a ............. (root/stem).
2. Almost 70% of the human body consists of .............. (water/blood).
3. Deficiency of proteins leads to a disease called ................ (kwashiorkor/dehydration).
4. An earthworm's body is made up of several parts called ............... (segments/vertebrates).
5. The area where a particular organism naturally lives is called its ......... (habitat/environment.).

Answer:

1. Radish is an example of a root.
2. Almost 70% of the human body consists of water.
3. Deficiency of proteins leads to a disease called kwashiorkor.
4. An earthworm's body is made up of several parts called segments.
5. The area where a particular organism naturally lives is called its habitat.

Page No 221:

Question 2:

Write T for the true statement and F for the false one. Correct the false statement(s).
1. Dehydration causes loss of salts and leads to weakness in the body.
2. Tap roots are also called true roots.
3. Stem of plants helps to bind the soil particles together so that they cannot be washed away.
5. Silk cotton is obtained from the kapok tree.

Answer:

1. True. Dehydration causes loss of salts and leads to weakness in the body.
2. True. Tap roots are also called true roots.
3. False. Stems of the plants conduct water and mineral salts from the roots to the leaves.
5. True. Silk cotton is obtained from the kapok tree.

Page No 221:

Question 1:

Fill in the blanks with the correct words.
1. ................... (Mung beans/Wheat) is an example of cereals.
2. ................... (Lustre/Smoothness) refers to the shine of a material.
3. ................... (Metals/Non-metals) are good conductors of heat.
4. Baking a cake is an example of a ................... (physical/chemical) change.
5. Snake has a special structures called ................... (scales/cerci) which helps in crawling.

Answer:

1. Wheat is an example of cereals.
2. Lustre refers to the shine of a material.
3. Metals are good conductors of heat.
4. Baking a cake is an example of a chemical change.
5. Snakes have a special structure called scales, which help them in crawling.

Page No 221:

Question 2:

Write T for the true statement and F for the false one. Correct the false statement(s).
1. Microorganisms present in milk turns it into curd.
2. We eat ginger as a stem.
3. Sandpaper is smooth to touch.
4. Plastic is an insulator.
5. Tearing a paper is a chemical change.

Answer:

1. True. Microorganisms present in milk turn it into curd.
2. True. We eat ginger as a stem.
3. False. Sandpaper is rough to touch.
4. True. Plastic is an insulator.
5. False. Tearing a paper is a physical change.

Page No 221:

Question A.1:

Which of these is an animal product?
(a) Egg
(b) Honey
(c) Milk
(d) All of these

Answer:

(d) All of these

Egg is obtained from hen. Honey is obtained from bees. Milk is obtained from cow, goat and buffalo.

Page No 221:

Question A.2:

These organisms feed on dead plants and animals.
(a) Herbivores
(b) Decomposers
(c) Amphibians
(d) carnivores

Answer:

(b) Decomposers

Decomposers, such as bacteria and fungi, feed on dead plants and animals.

Page No 221:

Question A.3:

Calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium are examples of
(a) Macrominerals
(b) Trace minerals
(c) Fibres
(d) none of these

Answer:

(a) Macrominerals

Macrominerals are needed by our body in large amounts. Calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium are examples of macrominerals.

Page No 221:

Question A.4:

These fibres cannot be digested by our body.
(a) Plant fibres
(b) Animal fibres
(c) Dietary fibres
(d) none of these

Answer:

(c) Dietary fibres

Dietary fibres are necessary to maintain a healthy digestive system; however, they cannot be digested by our body.

Page No 221:

Question A.5:

This method is used to separate grains from the stalks.
(a) Winnowing
(b) Threshing
(c) Hand picking
(d) Sieving

Answer:

(b) Threshing
The process of beating harvested crops to separate the grains from the stalk is called threshing.

Page No 221:

Question A.6:

The solution in which no more of the solute can be dissolved.
(a) Saturated solution
(b) Unsaturated solution
(c) Condensation solution
(d) none of these

Answer:

(a) Saturated solution
In a saturated solution, no more of the solute can be dissolved.



Page No 222:

Question A.7:

The process of making yarn from fibre is called
(a) weaving
(b) knitting
(c) spinning
(d) ginning

Answer:

(c) spinning
The process of making yarn from a fibre is called spinning.

Page No 222:

Question A.8:

This property of metals is used for making jewellery and other decorative articles.
(a) Roughness
(b) Lustre
(c) Transparency
(d) Opaque

Answer:

(b) Lustre
Lustre is the shine of a material. All metals, in pure state, are said to possess lustre. The pieces of jewellery and decorative items made form metals are lustrous. Therefore, this property of metals is used for enhancing the beauty and value of jewellery and other decorative items.

Page No 222:

Question A.9:

The interconversions of the three physical states of water are examples of .................................... change.
(a) irreversible
(b) reversible
(c) physical
(d) chemical

Answer:

(b) reversible
The interconversions of the three physical states of water are examples of reversible change because all the physical states of water can be changed from one state to another by heating or cooling.

Page No 222:

Question A.10:

A single-cell organism is called
(a) multicellular organism
(b) unicellular organism
(c) heterotrophs
(d) None of these

Answer:

(b) unicellular organism
A single-celled organism is called a unicellular organism. A multicellular organism is made up of more than one cell. Heterotrophs are the organisms that do not manufacture their own food.

Page No 222:

Question A.11:

These animals can survive in extreme temperatures.
(a) Cold-blooded animals
(b) Warm-blooded animals
(c) both (a) and (b)
(d) none of these

Answer:

(b) Warm-blooded animals
Animals whose body temperature does not change with the outside temperature are called warm-blooded animals. These animals can survive in areas having extreme temperatures such deserts and the Arctic.

Page No 222:

Question A.12:

Tap roots are also called
(a) fibrous roots
(b) true roots
(c) shrubs
(d) herbs

Answer:

(b) true roots
Tap roots are also called true roots because they come out of the seed after germination.

Page No 222:

Question A.13:

Shoot system includes-
(a) flowers
(b) stems
(c) leaves
(d) all of these

Answer:

(d) all of these

All parts of a plant that are above the ground form the shoot system. The shoot system includes stems, leaves, flowers and fruits.

Page No 222:

Question A.14:

Animals that do not have a backbone are called
(a) verteberates
(b) invertebrates
(c) predators
(d) none of these

Answer:

(b) invertebrates

Animals that do not have a backbone are called invertebrates.

Page No 222:

Question A.15:

Tropical forests are also known as
(a) grasslands
(b) deserts
(c) rainforests
(d) mountains

Answer:

(c) rainforests
Tropical forests are also known as rainforests because these regions receive heavy rainfall throughout the year.

Page No 222:

Question B:

1. Animal that eat only dead animals
2. Iron, zinc, copper are examples of these minerals
3. The process of separating the cotton fibres from its seeds
4. The outer covering of a seed
5. An animals that kills and eats other animals

Answer:

1. Scavengers
2. Microminerals
3. Ginning
4. Seed coat
5. Predators

Page No 222:

Question C:

1. Zebra is a common animal found in rainforests.
2. Growth is a part of respiration.
3. Wood is a good conductor of electricity.
4. Blowing a balloon is a physical, and irreversible change.
5. Tissue is the smallest living structure that is able to function independently.

Answer:

1. False
Zebra feeds mainly on grass. Hence, it is commonly found in grasslands.

2. False
Growth is not a part of respiration.

3. False
Wood is a bad conductor of electricity.

4. True

5. False
Cell is the smallest living structure capable of functioning independently.

Page No 222:

Question D:

1. Root Soil Stem (Hint: It is not a part of tree.)
2. Elephant  Gazelle Camel (Hint: It is not a grassland animal.)
3. Tomato Egg Honey (Hint: It is not an animal product.)
4. Silk Nylon Polyester (Hint: It is not a synthetis fibre.)
5 Wood Iron Plastic (Hint: It is a good conductor of electricity.)

Answer:

1. Soil
Plants grow in soil.
 
2. Camel
Camels are found in deserts.

3. Tomato
Tomato is a fruit.

4. Silk
Silk is obtained from the silkworm.

5. Iron
It is a metal; hence, it a good conductor of electricity.

Page No 222:

Question E.1.1:

Differentiate between herbivores and carnivores with the help of examples.

Answer:

Herbivores Carnivores
These animals feed on plants. These animals feed on other animals.
Some examples are cow, zebra and deer. Some examples are tiger, lion and wolf.

Page No 222:

Question E.1.2:

Differentiate between fat-soluble vitamins and water-soluble vitamins.

Answer:

Fat-Soluble Vitamins Water-Soluble Vitamins
These vitamins are stored in the fat tissues of our body and are used only when the body needs them. These vitamins are not stored in our body and need to be supplied regularly to our body through food items.
Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat-soluble vitamins. Vitamins C, B1, B2, B3, B12 and folic acid are water-soluble vitamins.



Page No 223:

Question E.1.3:

What is winnowing?

Answer:

Winnowing is a method of separating chaff from grain by wind or blowing air. In this method, a mixture of chaff and grains is taken in a winnowing basket. A person stands at a higher level and allows the mixture to fall on the ground. The grains, being heavier, fall vertically, whereas the chaff, being lighter, is carried away by the wind and forms a separate heap away from the grains.  

Page No 223:

Question E.1.4:

What is silk cotton? How is it obtained?

Answer:

Silk cotton is a plant fibre obtained from the silk cotton tree, also called kapok. The fruits of the kapok tree contain fibres that are light and fluffy. When the fruit ripens, it bursts, releasing the fibres.

Page No 223:

Question E.1.5:

Differentiate between conductors and insulators. Give examples.

Answer:

Conductors Insulators
These are the materials that allow heat to flow through them and conduct electricity. These are the materials that do not allow heat to flow through them and do not conduct electricity.
Metals are conductors of heat and electricity. Wood, air and plastic are examples of insulators.

Page No 223:

Question E.1.6:

With the help of an example, explain how physical change is different from a chemical change.

Answer:

Physical Change Chemical Change
No new substance is formed. A new substance is formed.
Example: Breaking of a glass is a physical change because no new substance is formed. Example: Burning of a paper is a chemical change, as ash is formed.

Page No 223:

Question E.1.7:

Write the features of warm-blooded animals. Give two examples.

Answer:

Animals whose body temperature does not change with the outside temperature are called warm-blooded animals. These animals can survive in areas having extreme temperatures such as deserts and the Arctic region. Most mammals and birds are warm-blooded.

Page No 223:

Question E.1.8:

In what way is a tap root system different from a fibrous root system?

Answer:

Tap Root System Fibrous Root System
A single root comes out from the seed after germination; it later gives rise to lateral roots. Roots grow from the base of the stem and have a bushy appearance.
Mango, neem, pine, sheesham are examples of the plants in which tap roots are found. Grass, maize, wheat are examples of the plants having fibrous roots.    

Page No 223:

Question E.1.9:

How are antennae and cerci helpful to a cockroach?

Answer:

Antennae help a cockroach to smell things. Cerci in cockroaches can detect the slightest movement and warn them of any danger.

Page No 223:

Question E.1.10:

It zoo a natural habitat of the animals? Give your reasons.

Answer:

Zoo is not a natural habitat of animals; it is a man-made place where animals are caged.

Page No 223:

Question E.2.1:

Write the names of three soluble and insoluble liquids.

Answer:

Three soluble liquids are alcohol, vinegar and honey.
Three insoluble liquids are kerosene, coconut oil and diesel.

Page No 223:

Question E.2.2:

Write the names of three fibres that we obtain from plants.

Answer:

The three fibres that we obtain from plants are cotton, jute and coir.

Page No 223:

Question E.2.3:

What is a reversible change?

Answer:

A change that can be reversed is called a reversible change. For example, a melted ice cream can be converted back into solid state by keeping it in a freezer. Similarly, melting of butter is also a reversible change. 

Page No 223:

Question E.2.4:

Differentiate between invertebrates and vertebrates. Give two examples of each.

Answer:

Invertebrates Vertebrates
Animals that do not have a backbone are called invertebrates. Animals that have a backbone are called vertebrates.
Examples are earthworm and cockroach. Examples are fish and frog.

Page No 223:

Question E.2.5:

Which part of a dolphin's body helps it to breathe?

Answer:

A dolphin breathes with the help of lungs. It comes to the water surface regularly to take in air.   

Page No 223:

Question F.1.1:

Write a short note on kwashiorkor.

Answer:

A common disease in children of rural areas, kwashiorkor is caused by protein deficiency in the diet.

A child suffering from kwashiorkor shows the following symptoms:

  • Potbelly
  • Stunted growth
  • Swelling of the face and limbs
  • Skin diseases
  • Mental retardation
  • Diarrhoea
If the treatment is started in time, increasing protein intake may correct the disease.

Page No 223:

Question F.1.2:

Explain how we can separate the components of a mixture are of different sizes, how can they be separated? Explain.

Answer:

The components of a mixture of different sizes can be separated by sieving. The smaller components pass through the pores of the sieve, whereas the larger components are left behind. These larger components can then be separated by sedimentation and decantation.    

Page No 223:

Question F.1.3:

Describe the movement in snail.

Answer:

Snail moves using a muscular organ called foot that produces a slimy substance called mucous. The snail crawls on the layer of mucous. The sticky mucous reduces friction between the foot and the ground by offering a smoother surface to crawl on, thus enabling the snail to move on a variety of surfaces. The muscular foot produces wave-like movements that push the snail's body forward.

Page No 223:

Question F.1.4:

How many kinds of aquatic habitat are there? Explain them.

Answer:

Aquatic habitats are mainly of three kinds:

(a) Freshwater habitat: Rivers, lakes, ponds and streams are examples of freshwater habitat. Fish, frogs, ducks, lotus and water lilies are found in fresh water.
(b) Marine habitat: Oceans and seas form the marine habitat. A large variety of sea animals such as whale, fish, crab, jellyfish, sea turtle and seaweed are found in marine habitat.    
(c) Coastal habitat: Coastal habitat refers to the region where land meets the sea. It is of the following types:

  • Estuaries: These are the regions where saltwater mixes with freshwater. Animals found here are crabs, oysters, waterfowl and worms. Mangroves and marsh grasses are some of the plants found here.
  • Coral reefs: These are rock-like structures made from the calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Besides corals, sea anemones, starfish and octopuses, a variety of fish are found in coral reefs.

Page No 223:

Question F.1.5:

Describe the movement of bones of in a human arm.

Answer:

The movements of bones in the human arm are caused by the contraction and relaxation of muscles. One end of a muscle is attached to a movable bone, whereas the other end is attached to a fixed bone. When the muscle contracts, it pulls the movable bone. Muscles work in pairs.



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