Ratna Sagar History Solutions Solutions for Class 6 Social science Chapter 3 Early Humans II are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Early Humans II are extremely popular among Class 6 students for Social science Early Humans II Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Ratna Sagar History Solutions Book of Class 6 Social science Chapter 3 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Ratna Sagar History Solutions Solutions. All Ratna Sagar History Solutions Solutions for class Class 6 Social science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 27:

Question A1:

______________ have been found at many Neolithic sites.
a. Tractors
b. Shears
c. Sickles
d. Scissors

Answer:

The correct answer is option (c).

Explanation: Sickles that were found at many Neolithic sites had been used by the early humans for harvesting crops. This proves that the humans had moved on from being hunter-gatherers to food producers.

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Question A2:

The first cereals to be grown were
a. wheat and rice
b. wheat and barley
c. barley and maize
d. barley and rice

Answer:

The correct answer is option (b).

Explanation: The early humans moved on from being hunters and gatherers to producing their own food. The first cereals to be grown were wheat and barley.

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Question A3:

Many pit-houses have been found at
a. Mehrgarh
b. Manipur
c. Mizoram
d. Burzahom

Answer:

The correct answer is option (d).

Explanation: Burzahom was the first Neolithic site discovered in Kashmir. The pits found were wide at the base and narrow at the top. The houses had a roof over the pits for shelter.

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Question A4:

Singing and ___________ must have been popular modes of entertainment.
a. miming
b. eating
c. dancing
d. aerobics

Answer:

The correct answer is option (c).

Explanation: Dancing and singing were community activities and also popular modes of entertainment. Their other activities included hunting and gathering food, trading produces through barter system. Dancing and singing served as ways of recreation.

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Question A5:

Since both stone and ______________ were used, this period is called the Chalcolithic Age.
a. aluminium
b. copper
c. bronze
d. tin

Answer:

The correct answer is option (b).

Explanation: The tools made of copper were much stronger than those of stone.This period extended from 4,000 BC to 2,000 BC. Though it was a short period, it was also important because there was a shift from stones to metals.

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Question A6:

____________________ is the earliest known farming and pastoral settlement in the Indian subcontinent.
a. Burzahom
b. Mismagiri
c. Agartala
d. Mehrgarh

Answer:

The correct answer is option (d).

Explanation: Mehrgarh in Pakistan was where the humans first grew crops and tamed animals. The earliest evidences of their food production was found as early as 7,000 BC. The evidences were charred grains and bones of animals.

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Question A7:

_____________________ is an important Neolithic site in Assam.
a. Daojali Hading
b. Jirania
c. Mehrgarh
d. Mismagiri

Answer:

The correct answer is option (a).

Explanation: The Neolithic Age lasted from 8,000 BC to 4,000 BC. Many evidences of polished stone tools, ceramic, mortars, pots have been found in Daojali Hading, a Neolithic site in Assam.

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Question B:

1. Humans became food-producers during the New Stone Age. ___________
2. The quality of pottery improved after the wheel was invented. ___________
3. The discovery of charred grains and sickles at a site indicates that people living there practised agriculture. ___________
4. Only stone tools were made during the Chalcolithic period. ___________

Answer:

1. The statement 'Humans became food-producers during the New Stone Age', is true.

Explanation: Early humans were hunter-gatherers. They lived a nomadic life, moved from one place to another in search of food, water and shelter. In the New Stone Age, which extended from 8,000 BC to 4,000 BC, the humans started producing food. They lived a settled life, built houses near the fields, domesticated animals. This brought about a change in the way of life of the early humans.

2. The statement 'The quality of pottery improved after the wheel was invented ', is true.

Explanation: The invention of the potter's wheel proved to be helpful to the early humans. It made making pots convenient. The clay could be moulded in various shapes and sizes with help of the wheel.

3. The statement 'The discovery of charred grains and sickles at a site indicates that people living there practised agriculture ', is true.

Explanation: Charred grains and sickles had been found on sites. This proves that agriculture was practised. The early humans shifted from hunting-gathering to agriculture. Wheat and barley were the first crops to be cultivated.

4. The statement 'Only stone tools were made during the Chalcolithic period' , is false.

Explanation: The Chalcolithic period is also known as Copper-Stone Age. Tools were made of stone as well as copper. This was because copper is stronger than stone and lasts for a longer time.



Page No 28:

Question C1:

Name some of the animals domesticated by early humans.

Answer:

The early humans were hunter-gatherers. Then, they began producing their food by cultivation of crops and also domesticated animals.
Some of the domesticated animals were as follows:
Dogs, pigs, goat, sheep, cattle, horses and donkeys.

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Question C2:

What enabled early humans to make pots of different shapes and sizes in much lesser time?

Answer:

Early humans learned to make clay pots, which were shaped by hand. The potters' wheel enabled them to make the pots of different shapes and sizes in much lesser time.

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Question C3:

In which period did pottery make its appearance in Mehrgarh?

Answer:

Pottery made its appearance in Mehrgarh (now in Pakistan) in Neolithic Period. This period existed from 8,000 BC to 4,000 BC. The pots were used as cooking vessels or for storing grains.

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Question C4:

Name two Neolithic sites in Tripura.

Answer:

Neolithic Age extended from 8,000 BC to 4,000 BC. The evidences of stone tools, finished or unfinished, were found in sites of Tripura.
Two Neolithic sites of Tripura were Teliamura and Jirania.

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Question D1:

Why did early humans make pottery? How did they learn to make pottery?

Answer:

The early humans made pottery for the following reasons:
1. To store grains
2. To store liquids and cooked food

The early humans learnt to make pottery out of clay. They were initially made by making a hole into a ball of clay or by making a long snake with the clay and coiling it up to make pottery. These were then baked in fire. The potter's wheel helped them to make pots of various sizes and shapes.

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Question D2:

How do we get to know about the existence of early farmers?

Answer:

The existence of early farmers are known to us by the discovery and excavation of sites. Mehrgarh in Pakistan was the earliest site where evidences of farmers and their settlements were found. The evidences dates as early as 7,000 BC. Charred grains and sickles have been found, which prove that humans had started cultivating crops by this time.

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Question D3:

Write a short note on Daojali Hading.

Answer:

Daojali Hading is a Neolithic site in Assam. Neolithic Age extended from 8,000 BC to 4,000 BC. Archaeological excavations have led to the digging up of various tools and evidences. These are polished stone tools, ceramics, kitchen items such as mortar, pestles and corn grinders. Many pots had also been dug up. These evidences prove that early humans used to cultivate crops as a source of food and store them in pots.

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Question E1:

How did agriculture change the life of early humans?

Answer:

The early humans initially used to hunt wild animals and gather fruits and nuts from the trees. This was the source of their food. When resources at one place were exhausted, they moved to another place. They lived like nomads. But agriculture changed their lives. They started to grow crops at one place. Cultivating crops and harvesting them after a certain time required them to stay at one place. Therefore, they no longer moved from one place to another in search of food, water and shelter. They built settlements near the crop lands, cultivated fields, made weapons and stone tools and pottery. They also started domesticating animals for various purposes.

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Question E2:

How was the invention of wheel an important step towards progress for early humans?

Answer:

The invention of wheel was an important step towards progress for early humans in the following ways:
1. Transportation from one place to another became faster and easier.
2. Moving heavy objects and taking them from one place to another became convenient.
3. The making of pottery became easier. The use of potter's wheel enabled early humans to make pots of various sizes and shapes. These pots were used for storing grains, liquid and for cooking food and grains.

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Question E3:

Describe the pit-houses found at Burzahom.

Answer:

Burzahom in Srinagar, Kashmir is a site where many pit-houses have been found. Stone tools were used to dig circular pits in the ground, which were then plastered on the sides using mud. The pits were generally broad at the base and narrow near the opening. The pits had steps that led to the bottom. These were roofed over to make them suitable to live in. Pit-houses were made to enable the early humans to withstand the cold. Some of the pit houses had clay or stone ovens, which were used for cooking food.

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Question E4:

Write short notes on – Daily life of early humans, Mehrgarh Period I.

Answer:

Daily life of early humans: The early humans lived in groups that had leaders. The most elder or the strongest member of the group was selected as the leader. Each member had separate tasks to perform. Some were responsible for harvesting crops, some to take care of the animals, some to make pots. The surplus crops were exchanged with other groups through barter system. The popular modes of entertainment were singing, dancing and painting.

Mehrgarh: Mehrgarh in Pakistan is the earliest known site of farming and pastoral settlement of early humans in the Indian Subcontinent. The earliest evidence of settlement here dates back to as early as 7,000 BC. It has been assumed that this was the site where early humans first cultivated crops and domesticated animals. Charred grains, sickles and bones of animals were found, which proved that early humans grew crops and settled here.

Period I: This period extended from 7,000 BC to 5,500 BC. Wheat and barley were the crops that were cultivated in this period. Bones of animals have been found in the sites and shows that cattle, sheep and goats were domesticated. The houses were simple, square- and rectangular-shaped mud houses. Pottery was not found. But several burial sites were found, many of which contained ornaments, limestone, stone axes, turquoise and sandstone along with animals and women figures.

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Question E5:

Why do you think the dead were buried with burial goods?

Answer:

The dead were buried with burial goods such as tools, ornaments, pottery, etc. This was because of the following reasons:
1.The early human beings believed in after-life. It was their belief that the dead would have a smooth after-life with their personal possessions present in the grave.
2.The burial goods were also given as a sacrifice to the ancestors.
3. This discouraged the reuse of the possessions by other people.

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Question E6:

Which according to you was a greater revolution–early humans becoming food-producers or early humans taming animals or early humans making pottery? Give reasons to justify your answer.

Answer:

Early humans becoming food-producers was a greater revolution than taming animals or making pottery. 
This is because of the following reasons:
1. The early humans were hunter-gatherers. They moved from one place from another in search of food, water and shelter. The cultivation of crops was a shift as they no longer had to live a nomadic life. They settled near the fields. This made their lives stable.
2. The dependence on natural sources ceased. They produced their own food, on which they survived.
3. Taming animals and making pottery followed after the beginning of agriculture. These were required to sustain their agricultural way of life. Animals were used for grazing and also as draft animals. Pottery was required to store grains and liquids. These were not revolutions. Agriculture led onto the invention and practice of domestication and pottery. Thus, the foundation of civilisation was laid.



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