Longman Panorma Civics Solutions Solutions for Class 7 Social science Chapter 6 A Woman S World are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for A Woman S World are extremely popular among Class 7 students for Social science A Woman S World Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Longman Panorma Civics Solutions Book of Class 7 Social science Chapter 6 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Longman Panorma Civics Solutions Solutions. All Longman Panorma Civics Solutions Solutions for class Class 7 Social science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 45:

Question A.1:

Women today have taken over some of the roles that were earlier seen as typically male dominated.

Answer:

This statement is true.

Explanation Today, women can be seen participating in jobs, such as doctors, pilots and engineers, that were traditionally male dominated.


 

Page No 45:

Question A.2:

Girls in the past were trained to become technical processionals.

Answer:

This statement is false.

ExplanationGirls in the past were traditionally believed to be homemakers and care takers, and hence were trained to become nurses and teachers, not technical professionals.

Page No 45:

Question A.3:

Education amongst the girls was confined to the richer sections only.

Answer:

This statement is true.

Explanation Education for girls was the privilege available to the rich. The poor could seldom afford to educate their girls and even if they could, the preference was given to educating the boy rather than the girl child.

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Question A.4:

Girls faced no domestic violence.

Answer:

This statement is false.

ExplanationGirls and women have been subjected to violence at home, which is known as domestic violence. The Parliament passed a law in 2006 that prohibits domestic violence and makes it a punishable offence.

Page No 45:

Question A.5:

Women's movement is a struggle for reform and equality.

Answer:

This statement is true.

ExplanationWomen activists have been struggling for long to ensure that women are treated equally with men and are treated with respect.


 

Page No 45:

Question B.1:

List some of the areas where women have made their presence felt in the recent past.

Answer:

Traditionally, women were seen as homemakers. However, of late, women have increasingly made their presence felt in all fields of life, especially in fields such as scientists, engineers, businessmen, teachers, doctors, and other blue collar jobs.



Page No 46:

Question B.2:

What were the girls and the boys in the past trained to do? How did it help in defining gender roles?

Answer:

Women were typically seen as homemakers while men were seen as breadwinners. Educating boys was encouraged more as compared to educating girls, and girls got less support from their parents in terms of educational opportunities.

Page No 46:

Question B.3:

Do you think stereotypes affect women's right to equality?

Answer:

Women were stereotyped as being unfit for jobs that require technical or scientific knowledge. As a result, people were found focussing more on educating boys for turning them into professionals like engineers and pilots. This, in turn, adversely affected women’s right to equality.

Page No 46:

Question B.4:

Why do girls drop out of school?

Answer:

Following are some of the main reasons girls drop out of schools:

• Poverty
• Early marriage
• Family responsibilities
• Safety

Page No 46:

Question B.5:

Do you think the Dalit girls face greater challenges than the other girls?

Answer:

Prejudice against Dalits has been prevalent since ages. On top of that, being a Dalit woman  acts as an insult to injury. Dalit women face more challenges, such as discrimination and violence, than other girls.

Page No 46:

Question B.6:

What do you understand by women's movement?

Answer:

Women’s movement is the struggle for bringing about a reform in women’s place in the society by ensuring their justice and equality. Women’s movements, through organisations, agitation, protests and litigations, have been working towards bringing a change in the status of women in the country.

Page No 46:

Question C.1:

Describe some methods in which the women have protested against injustice.

Answer:

Women have been protesting against discrimination, injustice and violence through various women’s movements. These movements have mainly focussed on issues like the dowry system, discrimination and sexual harassment at workplace and violence against women.

Through the relentless campaigning and activism against violence faced by women at home and elsewhere, women’s groups have succeeded in changing the law and the stand of the judiciary. In 2006, a law against domestic violence was passed by the parliament. Campaign against the dowry system has also borne fruit; laws have been passed to punish those involved in dowry cases.

Women’s movements have also led to increase in the awareness among women on important issues like health and education. Such awareness campaigns are undertaken through street plays, public meetings, cultural programs, etc.

Women activists launch rallies and protests that lead to reopening of cases and fresh investigations, creating awareness among the masses as well making the police and the judiciary take notice.

Page No 46:

Question C.2:

Can you think of a recent women's movement to show solidarity to the cause of women? Describe such event in your own words.

Answer:

Recently, many women’s movements have occurred that express solidarity towards the cause of women. None of them has been as popular and influential than the movement in reaction to the gang rape and murder of a 26 year old physiotherapy student on 16 December 2012 in Delhi.  

Public protests erupted all over Delhi shortly after the incident. They went on for many days and saw participation of thousands of people. These included citizens from all walks of life, be it students or the working class. The incident had an effect of galvanising all castes and classes of people to demand justice for the victim and to actively change the deteriorating situation of women’s safety in the country, particularly in Delhi.

As a result of this widespread agitation, the government formed a committee to look into means and ways to strengthen women’s safety. As per the committee’s recommendations, various criminal laws were amended, and punishments were made more stringent with respect to cases of violation of women’s modesty and safety.

Page No 46:

Question D.1:

Kiran Mazumdar was _________ in science from ________ _________.

Answer:

Kiran Mazumdar was a topper in science from Bangalore University.

Explanation - Kiran Mazumdar was topper in Science from Bangalore University. She then went to Australia and specialised in Malting and Brewing Technology from Ballarat College, Melbourne.

Page No 46:

Question D.2:

Rokeya Shekhawant Hussain knew how read and write _________.

Answer:

Rokeya Shekhawant Hussain knew how read and write Urdu.

Explanation - Rokeya Hussain knew how to read and write in Urdu. Although she was born in a rich family, she was prohibited from learning English and Bangla.

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Question D.3:

For ________ years ________ __________ advocates have been campaigning against violence against women.

Answer:

For 25 years years, women's rights advocates have been campaigning against violence against women.

Explanation - For 25 years, women’s rights advocates have been campaigning against violence against women. This violence takes the form of domestic violence at home and sexual harassment at workplaces.

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Question D.4:

In _________ the ________ _________ laid down the guidelines for protection of women against _______ _________ at work place.

Answer:

In 1997, the Supreme Court laid down the guidelines for protection of women against sexual harassment at work place.

Explanation - In 1997, the Supreme Court laid guidelines for protection of women against sexual harassment at work place. This was done through the judgement in the case of Vishaka v. State of Rajasthan, SC 1997.

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Question D.5:

In 2006 a law was passed in favour of women fighting against __________ ___________.

Answer:

In 2006, a law was passed in favour of women fighting against domestic violence.

Explanation - In 2006, a law was passed in favour of women fighting against domestic violence. This law is known as the Domestic Violence Act, 2005.
 



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