Science In Everyday Life Solutions for Class 8 Science Chapter 1 Crop Production And Management are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for Crop Production And Management are extremely popular among class 8 students for Science Crop Production And Management Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Science In Everyday Life Book of class 8 Science Chapter 1 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Science In Everyday Life Solutions. All Science In Everyday Life Solutions for class 8 Science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

Page No 23:

Question 1:

Write two examples for each of the following.

1. Kharif crops .................... ....................
2. Rabi crops .................... ....................
3. Natural fertilizers .................... ....................
4. Chemical fertilizers .................... ....................
5. Traditional methods of irrigation .................... ....................

Answer:

1. Paddy, Maize
2. Barley, Mustard
3. Compost, Neem bark
4. NPK, Urea
5.Canal irrigation, Furrow

Page No 23:

Question 2:

Write one word for the following.

1. Growing plants and rearing of animals for food, clothing, and other useful products ....................
2. Plants of the same kind grown on a large scale for food, clothing, etc. ....................
3. Process of loosening and turning the soil ....................
4. A tool used to plough the soil ....................
5. Process by which chemical fertilizers may get washed into water bodies ....................
6. Process of placing seeds in the soil ....................
7. Artificial application of water to the soil ....................
8. Undesirable plants ....................
9. A chemical that is used to destroy weeds ....................
10. Process of cutting and gathering of crops ....................

Answer:

1. Agriculture
2. Crops
3. Ploughing
4. Plough
5. Leaching
6. Sowing
7. Irrigation
8. Weeds
9. Weedicide
10. Harvesting

Page No 23:

Question 1:

Which of the following is a Rabi crop?
(a) Rice
(b) Maize
(c) Wheat
(d) Cotton

Answer:

(a) Wheat

Maize, rice and cotton are kharif crops.
































































































































































 

Page No 23:

Question 2:

Which of the following is a chemical fertilizer?
(a) Compost
(b) Bark of neem
(c) NPK
(d) Bone meal

Answer:

(c) NPK.

NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium) is a chemical fertilizer.

Page No 23:

Question 3:

Which of the following is a method of irrigation?
(a) Furrow
(b) Burrow
(c) Harrow
(d) Weeding

Answer:

(a) Furrow
Furrow irrigation is a traditional irrigation method of irrigation.

Page No 23:

Question 4:

Which of these implements is used for weeding?
(a) Axe
(b) Cultivator
(c) Trowel
(d) seed drill

Answer:

(c) Trowel
Trowel is used for weeding.

Page No 23:

Question 5:

Which of these is used for bulk storage of grains?
(a) Gunny bags
(b) Bins
(c) Silos
(d) Furrow

Answer:

(c) Silos
Silos are used for bulk storage of grains.

Page No 23:

Question 1:

Match the following.

Column A Column B
Ploughing Levelling
Humus Chemical fertilizer
Iron planks Natural fertilizer
Urea Loosening
Bone meal Rich in nutrients

Answer:

Column A   Column B
Ploughing Loosening
Humus Rich in nutrients
Iron planks Levelling
Urea Chemical fertilizer
Bone meal Natural fertilizer



Page No 24:

Question 1:

Name the different agricultural practices in the correct sequence.

Answer:

The different agricultural practises that are followed in the crop production are:
(i) Soil preparation
(ii) Sowing
(iii) Addition of manure and fertilizers
(iv) Irrigation
(v) Weeding
(vi) Harvesting
(vii) Storage

Page No 24:

Question 2:

Mention any five reasons to show the importance of ploughing.

Answer:

Ploughing is the first step in crop production. It is essential to plough the soil for the following reasons:
(i) Ploughing involves turning and loosening up the soil, which helps the roots to penetrate deep into the ground.
(ii) Ploughing allows the deep-rooted plants to breathe properly.
(iii) Ploughing enhances the growth of earthworms and microbes in the soil which are called as farmer's friends.
(iv) The earthworms and microbes further loosen the soil and add humus to it.
(v) Turning of the soil brings the minerals and nutrient-rich soil from the layers beneath to the surface, which enhances crop production.

Page No 24:

Question 3:

Differentiate between ploughing and levelling.

Answer:

No. Ploughing Levelling
1. Ploughing is the procedure to loosen and break up the soil. Levelling is the process of pressing the pieces and crumbs of ploughed soil into the ground to create a level surface.
2. A plough is used for ploughing. Levelling is done using iron planks.

Page No 24:

Question 4:

What are fertilizers? How do they help the soil?

Answer:

Fertilisers are the nutrient rich chemical substances that are added to the soil to increase the fertility of the soil. Use of fertilisers increases the fertility of the soil and results in better yields of food crops when added in required amount to the soil.

Page No 24:

Question 5:

What are the points to be kept in mind while sowing seeds?

Answer:

The following factors need to be considered while sowing the seeds:
(i) It is very important to make sure that the seeds that are used for sowing are clean and healthy.
(ii) The farmers should have a good knowledge of the tools that are used for sowing.
(iii) The seeds has to be sown at proper distances and at proper depths.
(iv) Care should be taken to ensure that the seeds are covered by the soil after sown, so as to prevent the damage caused by the birds.

Page No 24:

Question 6:

What does NSC stand for? What is it involved in?

Answer:

NSC stands for National Seeds Corporation. It is a government organisation in India, which produces good quality agricultural seeds. Apart from this, NSC has also set up seed testing centres across different parts of the country.

Page No 24:

Question 7:

What is irrigation? Describe the two methods of irrigation.

Answer:

Irrigation is the artificial supply of water to the soil which helps the growth of crops. The methods of irrigation can be mainly classified into two types:
(i) Traditional methods: Canal irrigation, furrow irrigation, chain pump irrigation are some of the examples of traditional methods of irrigation which are cheaper, but at the same time leads to wastage of water.
(ii) Modern methods: Drip irrigation and sprinkler irrigation are some of the examples of modern methods of irrigation which help in using the water economically.

Page No 24:

Question 8:

Differentiate between mixed cultivation and crop rotation.

Answer:

  

 Mixed cultivation  Crop rotation
 In this method of cultivation, two or more crops are cultivated in the same field at the same time. In this method of cultivation, two or more crops are grown in the same field but one after the other.
Crops for mixed cultivation are selected in such a way that the nutrient needs of one crops do not clash with the other. Crops in this method of cultivation are selected in such a way that the nutrients absorbed by the crops from the soil are replaced by the other.

Page No 24:

Question 9:

What is nitrogen fixation? How do leguminous plants help in nitrogen fixation?

Answer:

The process in which the free nitrogen available in the atmosphere is converted into its compounds is called as nitrogen fixation. The root nodules of the leguminous plants contain nitrogen fixing bacteria called rhizobium. The rhizobium fixes the atmospheric nitrogen into biologically absorbable form, which is then taken up by the plants and stored in plant tissues as plant proteins.

Page No 24:

Question 10:

Describe food products that we get from animals.

Answer:

The different food products that we obtain from the animals are,
(i) Milk, used to prepare a variety of products such as butter, cheese, ghee etc., is obtained from cow, buffalo and goat.
(ii) Animals give meat, which is another main source of food. Also, sea animals are source of sea foods.
(iii) Eggs from the birds such as goose, hen and turkey.
(iv) Honey from the honeybees.

Page No 24:

Question 1:

Describe in detail how soil is prepared before sowing seeds.

Answer:

The first and foremost step in the crop production is soil preparation. Soil preparation mainly involves ploughing and levelling. Ploughing, also called as tilling, is a method which involves turning and loosening the soil with the help of a plough. Ploughing helps the roots of the crops to penetrate deep in the soil and breathe properly. The loosened soil enhances the growth of earthworms which adds humus to the soil. The turning of the soil brings up minerals and nutrient rich soil which enhances crop production. In the next step, the field is levelled by breaking the soil crumbs using iron planks. This method is called levelling. After levelling, the soil is watered which is followed by sowing.

Page No 24:

Question 2:

Differentiate between chemical and natural fertilizers.

Answer:

 Fertilizer Manure
A fertilizer is a chemical substance which is used as a nutrient supplement to increase the yield of crops. Manure is the natural substance obtained by the decomposition of organic wastes which enhances the fertility of the soil.
It is produced in the factories.  It is produced in the fields.
Since, they are used as nutrient supplements, they are rich in plant nutrients. The amount of plant nutrients contained is less when compared to that of fertilisers.
Excess use may result in the loss of fertility of the soil over a period of time. Improves the fertility of the soil by adding a lot of humus to the soil.

Page No 24:

Question 3:

what are the different ways in which seeds are sown?

Answer:

Placing the seeds in the soil is called as sowing. Seeds are sown in two ways.
(i) Manual sowing : In this type of sowing, seeds are just sprinkled into the soil manually. This often results in the uneven distribution of seeds and may not ensure that the seeds are sown at correct depths.
(ii) Seed drill sowing : In this method the seeds are sown using a tool called seed drill. Sowing the seeds using a seed drill ensures the seeds are sown at uniform distance and at correct depths.

Page No 24:

Question 4:

How do farmers protect their crops from weeds?

Answer:

Weeds are the undesirable plants that grow amidst of the crops. Weeds are to be removed as they absorb the nutrients that are essential for the crops to grow. The removing of weeds is called as weeding which can be done either manually or with the help of chemicals. Manual weeding is a time consuming process and also requires a proper maintenance of the implements that are used for weeding. Therefore, a chemical called weedicide is used to kill the weeds which destroys the weeds without affecting the crops.     

Page No 24:

Question 5:

Describe how the practices of mixed cultivation and crop rotation help in increasing the crop yield.

Answer:

The techniques such as mixed cultivation and crop rotation help restore the fertility of the soil and increases the crop yield.
(i)Mixed cultivation: It is the technique wherein two or more crops are sown simultaneously on the same land, without any definite pattern. This system minimizes the risk of crop failure. The crops selected to be grown together are such that their products and waste materials benefit one another. For example, if wheat is grown along with a leguminous crop such as gram, then the uptake of nitrogen from the soil by the wheat crop is compensated through the addition of nitrogen to the soil by the leguminous crop.
(ii) Crop rotation: It is the practise of growing two or more varieties of crops in the same field in subsequent seasons. The duration of crop rotation determines the crops to be sown. For example: 

  • For one-year rotation: maize and mustard or wheat and rice are sown in succession.
  • For two-year rotation: maize, mustard, sugarcane and methi are sown in succession.

Page No 24:

Question 6:

Describe how nitrogen gets fixed in nature.

Answer:

The process in which the free nitrogen available in the atmosphere is converted into its compounds is called as nitrogen fixation. The root nodules of the leguminous plants contain nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as Rhizobium. The Rhizobium fixes the nitrogen which is then taken up by the plants and stored in plant tissues as plant proteins.



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