Longman Panorma Geography Solutions Solutions for Class 6 Social science Chapter 1 The Earth In The Solar System are provided here with simple step-by-step explanations. These solutions for The Earth In The Solar System are extremely popular among Class 6 students for Social science The Earth In The Solar System Solutions come handy for quickly completing your homework and preparing for exams. All questions and answers from the Longman Panorma Geography Solutions Book of Class 6 Social science Chapter 1 are provided here for you for free. You will also love the ad-free experience on Meritnation’s Longman Panorma Geography Solutions Solutions. All Longman Panorma Geography Solutions Solutions for class Class 6 Social science are prepared by experts and are 100% accurate.

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Question A.1:

What is the advantage and disadvantage of a globe?

Answer:

Following are the advantages of a globe:

  • It provides accurate shapes of continents and countries.
  • It provides details of cardinal directions without manipulation.
  • It provides the exact locations of places with respect to one another.

Following are the disadvantages of a globe:
  • Owing to limited space, many details cannot be shown on a globe.
  • The geographical details related to features cannot be properly shown on a globe.
  • It is difficult to carry a globe from one place to another because of its large size.

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Question A.2:

What is an atlas?

Answer:

An atlas is a large collection of maps. In the 16th century, geographers Mercator and Hondt were the first people to publish this collection of maps in the form of a book. They used the picture of the mythological figure Atlas holding the Earth on the cover page of their book. Since then, this book of maps has been known as atlas.

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Question A.3:

What do thematic maps show?

Answer:

A thematic map provides a specific type of information such as distribution of population, location of industries, distribution of soils, climatic conditions and air and railway routes within a specific region. Unlike physical and political maps, thematic maps show important information required to understand a region and its activities.

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Question A.4:

What are conventional symbols?

Answer:

Conventional symbols means using different colours, signs and symbols to present any information such as mountains, rivers, peaks, bridges, forts, airports, dams, roads etc on the map. These signs and symbols are used due to the lack of space on a map to show the actual space and shape of such features.

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Question A.5:

Draw the conventional symbols for the following: railway line, metalled road, bridge settlement.

Answer:


Page No 32:

Question B.1:

Globe and map.

Answer:

Globe Map
A globe is round in shape and is the exact copy of the planet Earth. A map is a copy of the globe on a flat paper. 
It is difficult to measure the distance between two places on a globe. It is easier to see the distance between two places on a map.
A globe is large in size; hence, it cannot be easily carried from one place to another. A map is drawn upon a rectangular piece of paper and is very convenient to carry.

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Question B.2:

Physical map and political map.

Answer:

 

Physical Map Political Map
It shows geographical characteristics like mountains, deserts and plains. It shows political boundaries between countries, states and cities.

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Question B.3:

Cardinal directions and intermediate directions.

Answer:

 

Cardinal Directions Intermediate Directions
There are four major cardinal directions: north, south, east and west. These directions fall under four cardinal directions. These are northeast, southeast, southwest and northwest.
They are denoted by letters N, S, E and W. They are denoted by NE, SE, SW and NW.
The directions on a map are always shown with respect to north. These directions can be found once the cardinal directions are marked.

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Question B.4:

Sketch and plan.

Answer:

 

Sketch Plan
It is a rough map with outlines drawn without a scale. It is a map with defined outlines of a very small area drawn with a scale.
It is drawn without the use of symbols and signs. It shows all minor details with signs and symbols. 
It is rough and not accurate. It is correct and accurate.

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Question C.1:

Every map should have a title.

Answer:

Every map should have a title, as it helps to understand what is there in the given map. The title of a map instantly provides the viewer with a brief description of the subject. For example, the title 'Different Soils in India' can quickly tell the viewer the subject matter of the map, i.e. soil types found in different parts of India.

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Question C.2:

A plan can show accurate details.

Answer:

A plan is usually drawn to assimilate accurate information of a very small area; for example, a layout of a new house will show the length and breadth of each room along with the heights of its walls and windows. The scale of a plan is different from that of a map. A plan depicts a very small area, so it is drawn on a large scale for better clarity on the subject matter.



Page No 33:

Question D.1:

Which are the different types of maps? What do they show?

Answer:

There are three different types of maps:

  • Physical map: This map represents the physical landscape (features) of a particular place. The features are represented with varied colours; for example, rivers, lakes, oceans, seas and other water bodies are represented with blue colour and elevations like mountains, plateaus and hills are shown with different colours and shades.
  • Political map: It does not show geographical features. It shows the political boundaries of a particular place, e.g. national and state boundaries of a place. These boundaries depict the locations of cities as per the details given on the map.
  • Thematic map: This map focuses on one specific theme, which could be rivers, roads, highways, airports or railways.

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Question D.2:

In how many ways can a scale be expressed? Explain them.

Answer:

A scale can be understood as the ratio or proportion of a map's dimensions and the dimensions of any two corresponding points on the ground. The different types of scales are as follows:

1. Statement: Any map can be drawn to scale where the size of one centimetre represents the distance of one kilometre on the Earth's surface. The scale of a map is from 1 cm to 1 km or from 1 cm to 5 km.​​
2. Representative fraction (RF): A map scale can be indicated by the fraction or ratio in which the numerator is one unit distance on the map. The RF of a map is indicated as 1/1,00,000 or 1 : 1,00,000. This means one unit distance on the map is equal to 1,00,000 units on the ground. 
3. Linear scale: It comprises a straight line of either 10 cm or 15 cm, which is graduated in terms of distances on the Earth's surface, e.g. kilometres. The actual distance between two given places on a map can be easily measured with the help of a linear scale.

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Question E.1:

An exact replica of the earth is a

a. map
b. sketch
c. globe
d. plan

Answer:

The correct answer is option (c).

Explanation: A globe is the most accurate replica of the Earth. It is a man-made three-dimensional model of the Earth that represents the correct sizes, shapes and locations of the places in relation to one another.

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Question E.2:

Trees are shown on the map by

a. the sketch of a small tree
b. a green dot
c. the letter 'T'
d. a brown dot

Answer:

The correct answer is option (a).

Explanation: A sketch of a small tree is used to denote trees on a map. It is a conventional symbol and is used in various countries with a mutual agreement.

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Question E.3:

A sketch is

a. not drawn to scale
b. a rough drawing
c. used to show necessary details
d. all of the above

Answer:

The correct answer is option (d).

Explanation: A sketch is a rough map with outlines drawn without using a scale; it contains all necessary information to get a rough idea about distances and directions.

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Question E.4:

The North Line in a map shows

a. an intermediate direction
b. the north and south directions
c. the north direction
d. a conventional symbol

Answer:

The correct answer is option (c).

Explanation: The north line on a map shows the north direction with respect to the position on the Earth. Often, it is shown on the map with the help of an arrow, and its tip is marked with the English letter N. This arrow on the map is known as the north line.

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Question F:

Identify the following conventional signs.

Figure

Answer:

1) Canal
2) Dam
3) Conifer
4) District
5) International boundary
 

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Question G:

Make a plan to your room. Be sure that you draw all the details - the bed, study table, almirah/wardrobe and any other object that you might have in your room.

Answer:

 



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