what is the difference between sodium ion and sodium atom ?

Sodium atom is neutral whereas sodium ion is a charged specie with a charge of +1.The number of protons and electrons in sodium atom is same i.e 11 whereas the number of protons in sodium ion (11) is more than number of electrons (10).The size of sodium ion is smaller than sodium atom.

  • 45

Sodium, an Alkali Metal from Group 1 of the periodic table, is the element with atomic number 11. That means it has 11 protons in its nucleus. A neutral atom of sodium will have 11 electrons around it. There will be a one-to-one correspondence between protons and electrons. An ion of sodium (or any other element) will have an unequal number of protons and electrons in it. That's the difference. Sodium atoms have a single valence electron in their valence shell. When we encounter sodium ions, we find them to have "loaned out" that valence electron, and they have an overall charge of +1 now. We write Na+1 or Na+ to indicate this ion. It makes sense when you look at that notation because the 10 electrons remaining around a sodium atom cannot balance the charge of the 11 protons in the nucleus. It's that simple. Lastly, any atom with an unbalanced (unequal) number of positive and negative charges will have an overall charge, and is considered an ion. Note that sodium is very reactive, and we don't find it free in nature. It is always found in combination with another or other elements in compounds. The most common sodium compound we find is NaCl, which is sodium chloride, or table salt. When you put salt in water, it "comes apart" into sodium and chlorine ions in the water. The sodium atoms will be in there with their 11 protons in the nuclei, and will have 10 electrons about them. The chlorine atoms will have "borrowed" or "stolen" one of the electrons from sodium, and the atoms of chlorine will be wandering around with an extra electron - the one they borrowed from sodium


THUMBZ UP PLZ
  • 8

Sodium, an Alkali Metal from Group 1 of the periodic table, is the element with atomic number 11. That means it has 11 protons in its nucleus. A neutral atom of sodium will have 11 electrons around it. There will be a one-to-one correspondence between protons and electrons. An ion of sodium (or any other element) will have an unequal number of protons and electrons in it. That's the difference. Sodium atoms have a single valence electron in their valence shell. When we encounter sodium ions, we find them to have "loaned out" that valence electron, and they have an overall charge of +1 now. We write Na+1 or Na+ to indicate this ion. It makes sense when you look at that notation because the 10 electrons remaining around a sodium atom cannot balance the charge of the 11 protons in the nucleus. It's that simple. Lastly, any atom with an unbalanced (unequal) number of positive and negative charges will have an overall charge, and is considered an ion. Note that sodium is very reactive, and we don't find it free in nature. It is always found in combination with another or other elements in compounds. The most common sodium compound we find is NaCl, which is sodium chloride, or table salt. When you put salt in water, it "comes apart" into sodium and chlorine ions in the water. The sodium atoms will be in there with their 11 protons in the nuclei, and will have 10 electrons about them. The chlorine atoms will have "borrowed" or "stolen" one of the electrons from sodium, and the atoms of chlorine will be wandering around with an extra electron - the one they borrowed from sodium


THUMBZ UP PLZ
  • -1
Na atomNa+ ion
It is neutralIt is not neutral
Net charge is zeroNet charge is +1
number of 11 positive charged protons = number of 11 negative charged electronsnumber of 11 positive charged protons > number of 10 negative charged electrons
Size is comparatively largeSize is comparatively small
  • 44

 Sodium, an Alkali Metal from Group 1 of the periodic table, is the element with atomic number 11. That means it has 11 protons in its nucleus. A neutral atom of sodium will have 11 electrons around it. There will be a one-to-one correspondence between protons and electrons. An ion of sodium (or any other element) will have an unequal number of protons and electrons in it. That's the difference. Sodium atoms have a single valence electron in their valence shell. When we encounter sodium ions, we find them to have "loaned out" that valence electron, and they have an overall charge of +1 now. We write Na+1 or Na+ to indicate this ion. It makes sense when you look at that notation because the 10 electrons remaining around a sodium atom cannot balance the charge of the 11 protons in the nucleus. It's that simple. Lastly, any atom with an unbalanced (unequal) number of positive and negative charges will have an overall charge, and is considered an ion. Note that sodium is very reactive, and we don't find it free in nature. It is always found in combination with another or other elements in compounds. The most common sodium compound we find is NaCl, which is sodium chloride, or table salt. When you put salt in water, it "comes apart" into sodium and chlorine ions in the water. The sodium atoms will be in there with their 11 protons in the nuclei, and will have 10 electrons about them. The chlorine atoms will have "borrowed" or "stolen" one of the electrons from sodium, and the atoms of chlorine will be wandering around with an extra electron - the one they borrowed from sodium. A link can be found below for more information.

  • 1
What are you looking for?