What is transitive verb?

A transitive verb is a verb that denotes an action which passes over from the doer or subject to an object.

Example: The mother fed the baby;

He filled up the form;

They enjoyed the party, etc.

An intransitive verb denotes an action which does not pass over to an object, or which expresses a state or being, such as:

He ran a long distance;

The balloon burst in the sky;

Please keep quiet, etc.

A matter needs to be noted here that most verbs can be used both as transitive and as intransitive verbs. It is, therefore, better to say that a verb is used transitively or intransitively rather than that it is transitive or intransitive.

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A transitive verb is a verb that denotes an action which passes over from the doer or subject to an object.

Example: The mother fed the baby;

They enjoyed the party

etc...

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a verb (or verb construction) that requires an object in order to be grammatical

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Transitive verbs are action verbs that have an object to receive that action. In the first sentence above, the direct object ball received the action of the verb hit.

Here are some more examples of transitive verbs:

I baked some cookies.

I rode the bicycle.

I moved the chair.

I stitched a quilt.

All of the verbs in the above sentences are transitive because an object is receiving the action of the verb.

But what about the sentence “The bird sang.” Is the verb in that sentence a transitive verb? No, in this case the verb sang is an intransitive verb.

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